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Anyone else with an 06 or 07 change your bearings but leave your stock Vanos pump? I know the pump in those years can be faulty but who has actually had an issue with the pump? I have a guy who can do my labor cheap so I'm thinking about playing it safe and doing the bearings even though im only at 48k miles, but I just dont know if spending $2k on a pump is worth it or not.
 

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I would at least replace the high pressure hose while in there. I've done the rod bearings on 2 cars and did the hoses on both. A 120 bucks well spent IMO as insurance. A lot of labor to go back in later if the hose started leaking. I view it like some of the parts for the SMG transmission. If I have to pull it, everything in the bell housing is getting replaced even the slave cylinder.
 

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I would at least replace the high pressure hose while in there. I've done the rod bearings on 2 cars and did the hoses on both. A 120 bucks well spent IMO as insurance. A lot of labor to go back in later if the hose started leaking. I view it like some of the parts for the SMG transmission. If I have to pull it, everything in the bell housing is getting replaced even the slave cylinder.
Hey capt, does the Vanos pump have to be removed to replace the internal hose?
 

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Hey capt, does the Vanos pump have to be removed to replace the internal hose?
When I did the second car, I tried to leave the pump in and found it too hard to get the new line back into position. I guess you could use mechanics wire attached to the new line and try to get it pulled down but a new hose has to be flexed some, it's steel braided and stiff, and it's hard to get the banjo fitting down to the side of the pump. It's real tight there. There is a small metal filter for the vanos pump that I change too and the pump has to be off to have access to that. For gear lash I used dial calipers and measured the end of the pump to the edge of the block before disassembly. I also made witness marks with a scrib around where the bolt heads touch the pump so when reinstalling, I put the same bolts in their original hole, snug the bolts up slightly and tap the pump left or right until you get it back to the original position, then torque to 10mn if I remember correctly. The oil pump is 20nm. That has to come out too. I found that to be easy too but gave up on trying to get the hose in without vanos pump removal. If you did it everyday I'm sure you'd learn some tricks.
 

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When I did the second car, I tried to leave the pump in and found it too hard to get the new line back into position. I guess you could use mechanics wire attached to the new line and try to get it pulled down but a new hose has to be flexed some, it's steel braided and stiff, and it's hard to get the banjo fitting down to the side of the pump. It's real tight there. There is a small metal filter for the vanos pump that I change too and the pump has to be off to have access to that. For gear lash I used dial calipers and measured the end of the pump to the edge of the block before disassembly. I also made witness marks with a scrib around where the bolt heads touch the pump so when reinstalling, I put the same bolts in their original hole, snug the bolts up slightly and tap the pump left or right until you get it back to the original position, then torque to 10mn if I remember correctly. The oil pump is 20nm. That has to come out too. I found that to be easy too but gave up on trying to get the hose in without vanos pump removal. If you did it everyday I'm sure you'd learn some tricks.
So basically you put the Vanos pump in the original position aligned with the witness mark, and verify the backlash.
 

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So basically you put the Vanos pump in the original position aligned with the witness mark, and verify the backlash.
Exactly. Same pump, same gears, no problem. If you had a new pump and 2 new gears then all bets are off IMO. I have a nice high end digital dial caliper that measure .0000. I used the long end and extended it. Slid it in with one end touching the pump edge and the other stoping on the block edge. Took the measurement several times at the same spot. I changed oil after 1K and examined my oil filter. Perfectly clean so the gears are OK.

There has been some debate on using the official BMW vanos gear lash technique and I was worried about how to do that when I first researched this project. A guy in England, JGS if I remember correctly, helped me with tips as he had done a bunch of these. He said if you read the BMW document explaing their procedure, it only applied to the older vanos pumps using the short teeth. He said the tall gear set up is more forgiving and that procedure does apply to the new version. If you read the TIS with that in mind, I see where he came up with that. I wasn't taking and chances and just made sure it went back to the same spot.
 
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I just had a customer pickup his 2007 m6 vert with 53600-miles on it. You are not too far off from that. :-/. I would rather play it safe and change them ASAP.

If I were you, I would change bearings/bolts, Vanos line, and solenoids. Keep your pump in. It is fine.
 
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