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I had to give up my m3 smg because of accepting a job overseas...I've come across an autotrader ad for a mint 2002 m5...It looks totally unbelievable...only thing is I don't know how to drive a manual transmission...do you think I'd be able to learn quickly enough to handle such a powerful car...I know how to ride a motorcycle, does this count:hihi: :M5launch: hiha :byee55amg
 

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No worries driving a stick should take you 30 min max and you should get the hang of it. The hardest for me was when you come to a stop on a hill. Balancing the clutch and the gas took a while to get it right. But as they say practice makes perfect. So best of luck with the car and your new job.
Though I wonder cause of your name sammy the bull :) what kind of work you do?? hmmm
 

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mguirg_gt74 said:
No worries driving a stick should take you 30 min max and you should get the hang of it. The hardest for me was when you come to a stop on a hill. Balancing the clutch and the gas took a while to get it right. But as they say practice makes perfect. So best of luck with the car and your new job.
Though I wonder cause of your name sammy the bull :) what kind of work you do?? hmmm
It's just a nickname I've had since my college days...It seems my friends think I look like the prototypical italian wise guy or should I say hitman...This completely makes no sense to me cause I am the nicest guy you will ever meet:hihi: :thumbsup: :D :byee55amg
 

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Well, I would not reccomend using a 400hp car as your first manual gearbox car. There is tons of perfomance in the M5, and having a novice in the shifting department behind the wheel might not be a great idea. With that being said, learning how to drive a manual isn't a hard thing to do. I knew the technique before I started, and in one day I was able to drive around fine, mind you with some hesitance and problems on hills. It really takes a few months to become completely comftorable with a manual transmission. I really don't think the M5 is a proper car to learn on.

Travis
 

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Rocket',

Funny, I think that the M5 also has a relatively easy gearbox and clutch. But, the general consensus I have heard from others is, it's on of the harder cars on the road to adjust and become smooth with. For me, it was a simple task of understanding where the clutch take up was, and how fast it was, along with figuring out proper revs for starting. Once that was done (5 mins), I was able to get some smoothness, and ultimately become decently fluid in my limited driving time with two M5's.

Travis
 

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Discussion Starter #8
M5Kid said:
Rocket',

Funny, I think that the M5 also has a relatively easy gearbox and clutch. But, the general consensus I have heard from others is, it's on of the harder cars on the road to adjust and become smooth with. For me, it was a simple task of understanding where the clutch take up was, and how fast it was, along with figuring out proper revs for starting. Once that was done (5 mins), I was able to get some smoothness, and ultimately become decently fluid in my limited driving time with two M5's.

Travis
good point travis...maybe I should rent a manual junker for the day and learn...thanks for the opinions/advice guys...I really do appreciate it
 

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Just be sure to set aside about $4k for a new UUC clutch job. If you're a novice, you can easily burn up the stock clutch learning how to drive a manual. The M5 is one of the easier manuals to drive; because of the torque, it's easy to get started even on a hill without stalling it. But the same torque can burn thru the weak and undersized OEM clutch very quickly. Go to a UUC aftermarket unit and you'll be good after that.
 

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SammyTheBull said:
I had to give up my m3 smg because of accepting a job overseas...I've come across an autotrader ad for a mint 2002 m5...It looks totally unbelievable...only thing is I don't know how to drive a manual transmission...do you think I'd be able to learn quickly enough to handle such a powerful car...I know how to ride a motorcycle, does this count:hihi: :M5launch: hiha :byee55amg
As former Motorcycle Safety Foundation (MSF) Managing Director, and a former MSF RiderCoach, and having served as a K1200S test rider for BMW on the Nordschleife event, I think that being familiar with operating a motorcycle and understanding how to operate the clutch and shifter, as well as the mechanical dynamics, although different controls than a manual car, would be a definite asset to learning how to drive a manual car.

You should have no problem adapting to a manual transmission in a car, if you have been reasonably comfortable operating and riding motorcycles for a period of time. You mention that you "know how to ride a motorcycle" but I am not sure how extensive your experience is.

Enjoy.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Ronin M5 said:
As former Motorcycle Safety Foundation (MSF) Managing Director, and a former MSF RiderCoach, and having served as a K1200S test rider for BMW on the Nordschleife event, I think that being familiar with operating a motorcycle and understanding how to operate the clutch and shifter, as well as the mechanical dynamics, although different controls than a manual car, would be a definite asset to learning how to drive a manual car.

You should have no problem adapting to a manual transmission in a car, if you have been reasonably comfortable operating and riding motorcycles for a period of time. You mention that you "know how to ride a motorcycle" but I am not sure how extensive your experience is.

Enjoy.
I've had my MSF license since 2000 and have been riding ever since...mostly renting big harley V twins when my buds come down from up north. We ride to the keys and up to Daytona...god I miss those days..:crying:
 

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Discussion Starter #12
mguirg_gt74 said:
No worries driving a stick should take you 30 min max and you should get the hang of it. The hardest for me was when you come to a stop on a hill. Balancing the clutch and the gas took a while to get it right. But as they say practice makes perfect. So best of luck with the car and your new job.
Though I wonder cause of your name sammy the bull :) what kind of work you do?? hmmm
if you really want to know....i'm an orthopod:byee55amg
 

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Need4Spd said:
Just be sure to set aside about $4k for a new UUC clutch job. If you're a novice, you can easily burn up the stock clutch learning how to drive a manual. The M5 is one of the easier manuals to drive; because of the torque, it's easy to get started even on a hill without stalling it. But the same torque can burn thru the weak and undersized OEM clutch very quickly. Go to a UUC aftermarket unit and you'll be good after that.
Need4Spd, I was about to post the exact same message till I got to your post..:D

No way, No how, I would tell any novice (manual driver) to get out there and learn how to work a manual with a 6spd 400 HP beast! Unless of course you've got extra money to burn for a new clutch and possibly new flywheel if you really mess up. :M5rev: :M5launch:

Louie
 

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Here in Europe most cars are manual, so we learn to drive it from driving school, but however most guys, especially in smaller towns, like me have driven cars before driving school, but most young girls have never ever driven a car before their first driving lesson, and off they go with a manual gearbox, so you as a driver already will have no problem in learning, just be careful with clutch slippage, yes you are supposed to just let go of the clutch! :haha:

No but, I'm sure of there should be no troubles for you, just take it easy and remember to shift, and remember to push that clutch thingy in every gear shift :M5launch:

Good luck :M5thumbs:
 

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Discussion Starter #15
atlantisvip said:
Need4Spd, I was about to post the exact same message till I got to your post..:D

No way, No how, I would tell any novice (manual driver) to get out there and learn how to work a manual with a 6spd 400 HP beast! Unless of course you've got extra money to burn for a new clutch and possibly new flywheel if you really mess up. :M5rev: :M5launch:

Louie
you're right...and even if I did have the extra dough...I would not want to harm such a beautiful piece of engineering marvel:nono: :wroom:
 

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mguirg_gt74 said:
The hardest for me was when you come to a stop on a hill. Balancing the clutch and the gas took a while to get it right.
Thats when you use the handbrake then raise the rpm and release the clutch

I think driving a manual is easy. The only thing to it to get to where the clutch releases and then feeding the throttle at the clutch's release point :M5thumbs:
 

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I never use the handbrake, in a hill, one foot on the brake the other on the clutch, or balancing the clutch, but this causes wear so... When you can go, just upp the clutch slightly untill you feel it grabbing, and then let go of the brakes, and off you go!

I would class the M5 as very simple car to drive because of the massive tourqe at idle! Wery difficult to stall.

Just get it!
 

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Yes it can be done but it wears the clutch like you mentioned
 

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Sammy I suggest you take a few driving lessons from a local driving school.

It will help to get a little training from a professional. Since you are already experienced with driving otherwise, it's simply a matter of understanding gear changes, clutch control etc.

If you are in the UK or Ireland it's also a good opportunity to get a full understanding of the implications of driving on the other side of the road.

Have a look at this link:

http://www.bsm.co.uk/

:cheers:
 

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Ashok Arora said:
Sammy I suggest you take a few driving lessons from a local driving school.

It will help to get a little training from a professional. Since you are already experienced with driving otherwise, it's simply a matter of understanding gear changes, clutch control etc.

If you are in the UK or Ireland it's also a good opportunity to get a full understanding of the implications of driving on the other side of the road.

Have a look at this link:

http://www.bsm.co.uk/

:cheers:
This is really worth it as Ashok suggests.

Also if you get this cracked and what to take it on to the next level..
try

Don Palmer Coaching : http://www.donpalmer.co.uk/

and

Porsche's Official Driving Coach, Bernard Aubrey.
Bernard Aubrey - 01483 773939(found this on the web so don't know if it's still valid!) Ring the Porsche HQ in reading and ask them. Think he also works for a company called MasterClass.

Here's an interesting thread on this subject from Piston Heads

http://www.pistonheads.com/gassing/topic.asp?f=48&h=0&t=96423


All of the above is something i've thought about doing in advance of the driver's run.

Cheers
DMC
 
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