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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

Has anyone replaced a Cam Sensor themselves ?

I have a SES fault which is Cam Sensor Exhaust Bank 2.

I believe they are located at the rear of the Block.

Car is underpowered and would like to fix/repair ASAP.

Anybody any experince of doing this, and if yes, is it fairly straightforward or is it a Pig, due to its location.

I tried seaching in the FAQ's, but it kept coming up error.

Many thanks,

The Gorilla.
 

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I was told by my mate that its an easy job, but my car came in an invoice for £250(ish) for replacing a faulty cam sensor. It billed 2 hours labour... I think the sensor was £54 and the O ring was £5 ish

Your a brave man for thinking about doing it yourself!
 

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I have not replace such a sensor myself, but I think it is not very complicated.

It is located at the lower outside rear of the timing cases on each side of the engine. That is on the side of the engine facing rear.

You will need to remove the passenger comparment air ducts (and possibly the filter holders too) to reach the sensors.

Having small hands will help.

The sensors are each held in place by one screw. There is also a rubber sealing ring sold separately which you might just as well replace while you are at it.

As usual when dealing with an Aluminium engine block, do not overtighten.

David
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
DavidS said:
I have not replace such a sensor myself, but I think it is not very complicated.

It is located at the lower outside rear of the timing cases on each side of the engine. That is on the side of the engine facing rear.

You will need to remove the passenger comparment air ducts (and possibly the filter holders too) to reach the sensors.

Having small hands will help.

The sensors are each held in place by one screw. There is also a rubber sealing ring sold separately which you might just as well replace while you are at it.

As usual when dealing with an Aluminium engine block, do not overtighten.

David

Hi David,

Many thanks for that, is seems simple enough to me, just more a time related item than anything else.

I am assuming that Bank 2 is the left hand bank, as you look at the car, from the front looking towards the boot, in that the firing order suggests that cylinder 1 is located in Bank 1.

Again, many thanks for your assistance, much appreaciated.

Regards,

The Gorilla.
 

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No, Bank 2 is the left side of the car when looked at from inside.

There is an electrical connector directly at the sensor. It unplugs downwards. There probably are some kind of latches involved. Look at the new sensor.

David
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
DavidS said:
No, Bank 2 is the left side of the car when looked at from inside.

There is an electrical connector directly at the sensor. It unplugs downwards. There probably are some kind of latches involved. Look at the new sensor.

David

David,

Again many thanks, hate to think I would have replaced the wrong one !!

The electrical sensor has a push retaining spring clip, which when pushed in releases the electrical connector.

Many thanks, again,

The Gorilla.
 

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Let us know how it goes and if you can take pics that would be great! :haha:
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks,

That link has been a great help.

I am doing the replacement tomorrow morning, so hopefully with all the info available, should be able to get the car running back normally.

Funny that the Exhaust sensors are set up higher than the Intake sensors, still if it works, fine.

Again, thanks for all the input.

The Gorilla.
 

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I replaced my driver side (LHD car) exhaust CPS last week. I tried replacing them from the top as indicated in the above link, but had a hard time. It was easy getting the vent duct and electrical connector off, but I kept getting the 5mm allen wrench stuck between the bolt and the heater hose. I could only move the bolt about 1/8 or a turn, but then couldn't get the wrench out of the bolt. So I gave up trying from the top.

I had better luck putting the car up on ramps, dropping the plastic undertray, and using an air ratchet with a 5mm hex bit. That way only took me about 15 minutes. Just let the car cool a while after pulling it up on the ramps, as the exhaust manifolds heat up quickly (and hold the heat for a while). Long sleeves and mechanics gloves help.

I suggest replacing the O ring and the bolt. It is supposed to be a one time use bolt, as it has loc-tite on it already. The worst part for me was that the exhaust CPS was on national back order from Germany for 3 weeks. Oh yeah, don't forget to use something like the Peake Research RC5 tool to reset the SES light and fault codes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Well it's replaced, Exhaust Cam Sensor Bank 2, and the car is fine.

The Gorilla though has scraps and cuts all over his Gorilla mits, and will require a large quantity of Banana Juice tonight.

I think overall the guides and past information contained in this Thread for replacing the Cam Sensors are more than adequate for DIY.

All I would add are the following -

If you do the job from above, which I did, make sure that you have a 5mm allen key with extended shaft, standard ones are just two short.

If you use a 5mm allen drive in a socket make sure you have the small recessed type, as standard ones, when all fitted together push the rachet into all the heater matrix rubber hoses, which makes it diffucult.

Remove the bottom plastic cover that sits below the engine / gearbox, so anything you drop you can quickly recover from the ground.

Purchase a new locating bolt with the Cam Sensor and the rubber O ring, as the locating bolts are, a] fitted with something like Loctite, and b] the internal of the heads can chew a little, and if you had to take it out again, then you would cuss !

Time wise it took me about 90 minutes all done, but with an extended 5mm Allen Key, I think you could do it all in under the hour.
If you have large hairy mits, a la Gorilla, then resign yourself to some skin loss, and in my case, hair as well !!!

I would not tackle the Intake Cam Sensor on Bank 2 though, as from what I saw today, it looks an absolute Pig of a Job.

Both the Cam Sensors on Bank 1, Intake and Exhaust, both seem reasonable to tackle though.

Hope this helps.

The Gorilla.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
sfm5 said:
Gorilla,

Would you have the exact part numbers for the exhaust cam position sensor?

Hi sfm5,

the part numbers are -

B13.62.2.249.320 Pulse Generator [ Exhaust Cam Sensor in English]

B12.14.1.748.398 Sensor O Ring [ notice how it becomes a sensor again]

I do not have the part number for the locating Bolt.

Please be aware that the Intake Sensors and the Exhaust Sensors are different, and can not be swapped, under any circumstances.

Back to me Banana Juice !!

The Gorilla.
 

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I've done the intake cps, it basically involves hours of cursing, 40 cigarettes and then bending and breaking a wiring loom bracket out of your way (in one of those impossible to reach places). I recommend leaving it to the professionals :M5thumbs:
 

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Úbermensch said:
I've done the intake cps, it basically involves hours of cursing, 40 cigarettes and then bending and breaking a wiring loom bracket out of your way (in one of those impossible to reach places). I recommend leaving it to the professionals :M5thumbs:
With a handle (nickname) like yours, how can you possibly leave anything to any pro?, Nietsche would have asked.

;-)

David
 
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