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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hello all,

This how-to has been laying around for some time, and finally I had some time to do a write up for you guys. Basically this is a 4-part brake overhaul for the E60 M5 consisting of:

1. Brake disc upgrade;
2. Brake pads upgrade;
3. Brake line upgrade;
4. Brake caliper painting.

TOOLS NEEDED:
1. Normal hand tools: Torx set, screwdrivers, socket-set, wrench, pliers etc.
2. Brake bleeder (pressure bleeder, vaccuum bleeder or similar will do).
3. Drill and wire brush
4. Ceramic grease, WD40, brake cleaner
5. Microfibre rags
6. Cheap second hand oven (or use your wife's expensive kitchen oven).
7. Jack stands
8. Car Jack
9. VHT Engine Enamel/Paint
10. Painter's tape
11. Nitril gloves

PARTS USED:
1. Zimmermann E60 M5 discs and Hawk Performance brake pads: https://www.ecstuning.com/b-assembled-by-ecs-parts/performance-front-brake-service-kit/34112282805kt5/
2. Hawk Performance brake pads rear: https://www.ecstuning.com/b-hawk-parts/rear-hps-brake-pad-set/hb630f.626/
3. ECS Tuning Exact-Fit stainless steel brake lines: https://www.ecstuning.com/b-ecs-parts/exact-fit-stainless-steel-brake-lines-complete-kit/e60-slash-63-slash-6434/
4. Rear brake pad wear sensor: https://www.ecstuning.com/b-genuine-bmw-parts/rear-brake-pad-wear-sensor/34356789493/
5. Rubber gasket set for the brake calipers (available at local auto parts store)

STEPS:
1. Step one is to double check all your parts and materials:





2. Jack up your can and place it on jack stands:


3. Inspect your brakes and remove your spacers (if you have any), remove your brake calipers and remove your brakes discs. To prevent any brake fluid flowing out of the old lines, put a small cap on the ends. Lift the brake line end up, and wrap some nitril gloves around it. This will prevent any brake fluid leaking out.





4. Using a drill and wire wheel, clean up your hubs. Paint them in any durable 'rust resistant paint'.




5. Disassemble the brake calipers as far as needed. Scrub off any debris.





6. Sand the brake calipers with a course grit, then 600 grit, up till the point that you think is necessary. DO NOT use any aggressive paint remover as this makes a huge mess and is difficult to remove.


7. Mask (tape-up) the brake caliper parts that should not get any paint on them carefully.



8. Degrease the brake calipers by washing them and then using brake cleaner. Hang them in a well ventilated, dust-free area and use a mask to protect yourself from the fumes. Paint the calipers by following the instructions on the cans, and spray in multiple light coats. I chose to place special heat-resistant M stickers on the front calipers and paint them over with clear enamel.




9. To cure the paint, follow the paint manufacturer's instructions and bake the calipers in your fancy second hand oven. After this let them air out.



10. Clean all guides and other parts that will go back onto the calipers. Install all new replacement gaskets, rubbers and pistons.




Use a bit of Ceramic grease on the backs of the brake pads and the sides to prevent any squeeking.


11. First, install your new clean brake lines onto your calipers. Place a towel on any surface that might get leaked on with brake fluid as this stuff is very aggressive and will eat your paint. Second, loosen your old brake lines, and screw in the new ones. Wipe off any brake fluid immediately!



12. Bleed the brakes using a pressure bleeder/vacuum bleeder/Schwaben/Motive brake bleeder. I used the oldskool 2-person manual method to double-check the brakes for the 2nd time.


13: FINISHED. Admire your freshly painted, good looking, high-performance brakes:



Hope this was helpful! Cheers!
 

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Nicely done DYI. The only thing that I would disagree with is the painting of the hubs. Not sure if that is a good idea. Generally you want to take a wire brush and get rid of any rust, but paint can add runout and also make it difficult to torque the wheels properly as you are pressing the disks towards the painted hubs when you tighten your wheels. Just my $0.02.
 

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Damn that came out nice! I love your attention to detail, this is a very well done write up.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Nice post...great step by step guide
Just one question....is the left front disc rotor drill pattern wrong on number 13? it looks like a front right disc rotor?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Nice post...great step by step guide
Just one question....is the left front disc rotor drill pattern wrong on number 13? it looks like a front right disc rotor?
I think you are right on that one. Just after the picture I noticed and swapped them around. Was under the impression that they were not directional. Sharp eye!
 

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gladI'm just about to change mine as well so you guide is great help as I prepare myself for the task ahead of me!....just glad you spotted your little error....:)
 

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2009 BMW E63 M6, Sapphire Black
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nice work! Are our caliper pistons aluminum or some other metal? I notice the major rebuilders out there (centric, cardone, ect) refer to them as metal rather than aluminum.
 
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