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· In Memoriam
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Hi jclyman. Yes it turns over and starts but peter's out after 2 seconds or so. After that, it won't fire up but the starter tries. It won't stay running because the 10W60 oil as a lot of people rave about so much is too thick in cold weather. My guess is the oil is probably too thick to go through the oil filter in real cold weather, so it won't circulate. However, I got it to start late afternoon(woo hoo!!!) as the temp rose a bit and drove it around for a while to let her get to proper operating temperature.

Do you have a comment on the block heater?
My first move (free advice) would be to change the oil to 0w-30 (for the winter). 10w is probably way too thick at low temps. There is a LONG and excellent post re: oils: http://members.rennlist.com/oil/Motor Oil 101.htm

Personally, I wouldn't consider a heater ... There are a few cars in Finland and other cold places whose owners post here, and I don't think they worry about it (but, I am not sure). BMWs (all) are usually pretty good at starting (with a strong battery) in cold conditions.

My $ 0.03
 

· In Memoriam
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So you don't think the oil was too thick to circulate through the Oil Filter to stay running? Things warmed up a few degrees and it started just fine. It ran great after that.

Any comments on the block heater?
I believe all modern cars have an oil filter bypass in case the filter gets clogged. All of mine (prior to the BMWs) have had one, even my 1955 MG TF1500. Very early VWs didn't have one, though. So I assume BMW has the same thing.

And, I am sorry if I sounded like the heavy oil was your only problem, just that I thought it was TOO thick for your current environment ...
 

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Here is some extra info the Company emailed me:

Oil Pan Heaters<O:p</O:p
Our oil pan heaters are thin, flexible heating pads that are permanently bonded to the bottom or side of the oil pan. The heater has the special adhesive already on it, by simply peeling off the protective backing and pressing the heater firmly in place on a clean, flat surface, the heater is ready to be used. Note the heater must be installed on a smooth flat area, free of grooves and ridges. Only to be installed on metal oil pans.<O:p</O:p
No special tools or skills are required. Everything for a complete installation is included with each heater.<O:p</O:p

An Oil Pan Heater is far superior to a block heater and more efficient as a block heater only "warms" a part of the engine not all the engine.<O:p</O:p

An Oil Pan Heater "heats" the complete engine starting at the bottom.<O:p</O:p
The hot oil heats the crankshaft, which in turn heats the connecting rods, pistons and cylinder heads. Remember "heat" rises.<O:p</O:p
In 2 hours, our oil pan heaters can raise the engine oil temperature 100F / 40C.
By installing an Oil Pan Heater, your vehicle will start easier and there will be less engine wear.

Based on an oil capacity of 5+ quarts, we recommend the model 16 with an output of 250 watts.<O:p</O:p
The model 16 measures 4” x 5” and requires a smooth flat surface on the side or bottom of the oil pan for installation.
Here's a thought I would clear up before I installed one ... I'm thinking it works like a 250w light bulb ... I would be concerned that that much heat would begin to deform the plastic (don't know what kind of plastic it is) belly pan ...
 

· In Memoriam
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Good thought. When the engine is at operating temperature or hotter, isn't it also radiating a lot of heat toward the plastic belly pan?
Actually, true ... good point ... I'm not sure it is as hot as a 250w bulb, though.
 
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