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Your right, Factory connects at top of shock. so the red arrow above should point the other way. the shock is the termination point, the control wires get routed thru the cable harness on side of engine bay, and go down under the fresh air vents, where I cant see them

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Discussion Starter #62
Awesome! Good stuff. Thanks. I'll work something up and post some pics to follow up with.

I was waiting for shock top mounts but I was told they wouldn't be here until the middle of June. Canceled that. Ordered from another place and told again by that place, it would be even longer than that.... so I'm in a holding pattern.
 

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Awesome! Good stuff. Thanks. I'll work something up and post some pics to follow up with.

I was waiting for shock top mounts but I was told they wouldn't be here until the middle of June. Canceled that. Ordered from another place and told again by that place, it would be even longer than that.... so I'm in a holding pattern.
bummer, but middle of June is around the corner. where are you ordering from?
 

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It's a bad picture, I'm sorry, but I tried to orientate in the perspective of them both lining up to the swivel bearing. The B6 perch might be slightly higher than OE but not by much:

View attachment 938990
It's a bad picture, I'm sorry, but I tried to orientate in the perspective of them both lining up to the swivel bearing. The B6 perch might be slightly higher than OE but not by much:

View attachment 938990

omg, you're an absolute legend. This must be new to all of us. Can you show us how it compares in the rear?
 

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My spring are in the wrong spot by 90 deg on the bottom
Idiot suspension shop!

Can i get away with jacking car up and using spring compressors then rotate it??

Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter #69
As this all starts to come together, I'm finding that by assembling according to OE[0] and Bilstein[1], all new components except the articulating disk and and bump stop support (i know, there's an internal bump stop, but the directions say..), the shock shaft turns as the result of tightening the top nut. Now this is all fine but the old shocks were so bad, they shaft turned with the greatest of ease - these new shocks are much more difficult to twist. I may just be hung up on how bad the old assemblies were, and not appreciating the way new hardware feels.I half expected the protective bootie to move radially as the shock shaft is turned. Here's a few pictures to illustrate "at rest":

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...and after having been turned:

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This PROBABLY DOESN'T MATTER but now, it messes with the orientation of the alignment pin. To get it right, I'd have to torque the shaft nut while the entire assembly is in the vehicle, so that "at rest" and facing forward the protective bootie is not bound.

How does all this sound?


[0] RealOEM.com - Online BMW Parts Catalog
[1] https://productdeskapi.cart.bilsteinus.com/media/products/bilstein/E4-WM5-Y442A00.pdf
 

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Discussion Starter #70
I got to thinking, what I'm describing with the protective booty is actually going to appear far less once the assembly is loaded by the weight of the car , there simply won't be enough tension to make it look so awful.

Even still, this puts me in a position where I will need to dry fit the entire assembly inside of the housing so that it aligns with the alignment pin , and then torque it down from there.
 

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Discussion Starter #72
Looking at the bilstein diagram you should just be able to peel back the bottom of the dust boot and turn it.
Yeah, at first glance it looks like you should be able to do that. But there seems to be a natural fit with regards to a lip of the spring pad overlapping with what feels like a steel ring at the bottom here, not to mention it feels like there's some adhesive keeping the protective bootie secured at the bottom:

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Discussion Starter #73
Sorry, to clarify: the steel ring I'm talking about is underneath the protective bootie, in the rib just above where the spring pad lip feels like it should naturally sit.
 

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Something is not right. The boot must be able to turn without binding. Did you say you installed the stock stop bumper?
 

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Discussion Starter #75
Something is not right. The boot must be able to turn without binding. Did you say you installed the stock stop bumper?
Right. I just don't know how "wrong" it is, given how toasted the old assembly was. It was in pretty bad shape to begin with.

There is no bump stop used in the B6's, since this component is internal.

The only things I reused of the old assembly were the springs and the steel plates such as the ones I mentioned earlier. Everything else, especially all rubber parts and seats, are new OEM.
 

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Yeah, at first glance it looks like you should be able to do that. But there seems to be a natural fit with regards to a lip of the spring pad overlapping with what feels like a steel ring at the bottom here, not to mention it feels like there's some adhesive keeping the protective bootie secured at the bottom:

View attachment 939270
It seems excessive for there to be adhesive when this is a non off-road vehicle. The press fit over that ring/lip is likely very tight in addition to the spring pad clamping down on the boot.

You should be able to pry back the spring pad enough to release the tension and rotate the dust boot on the internal ring.
 

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Discussion Starter #77
It seems excessive for there to be adhesive when this is a non off-road vehicle. The press fit over that ring/lip is likely very tight in addition to the spring pad clamping down on the boot.

You should be able to pry back the spring pad enough to release the tension and rotate the dust boot on the internal ring.
I don't disagree. The old hardware didn't appear to include a bootie that was glued on the bottom. Then again, this could have just become detached at some point during its life. I wouldn't be able to pull the bootie down past the lip of the new pad, as pictured, if I went that route.
 

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I don't disagree. The old hardware didn't appear to include a bootie that was glued on the bottom. Then again, this could have just become detached at some point during its life. I wouldn't be able to pull the bootie down past the lip of the new pad, as pictured, if I went that route.
Yea, the E39 is not secured at the bottom, and the OE E60 part doesnt have a retaining ring/lip either.

I dont think you need to pull the dust boot over the spring pad, you should be able to unseat the surface and turn it. If you leave it like that it will likely tear.
 

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best I have, happened to be taking photos a while back of the stickers. I do know my plane jane Bilstien B8's on my E60 reveal the chrome strut rod. they are free from possible bind like you are experiencing.
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Discussion Starter #80
Yea, the E39 is not secured at the bottom, and the OE E60 part doesnt have a retaining ring/lip either.

I dont think you need to pull the dust boot over the spring pad, you should be able to unseat the surface and turn it. If you leave it like that it will likely tear.
I sent an email off to Bilstein, their support has been pretty good. I wouldn't imagine the recommendation is to cut or tear the bootie. I don't think the retaining ring/lip has much to do with this, i just wanted to bring it up as a note. That does not have anything to do with the fact that the bottom of the bootie is glued to where the bottom (and the top, for that matter) it meets the chromed strut rod.

Just so things are perfectly clear, the chromed strut rod is supposed to swivel, or at least the assembly is supposed to swivel around the chromed strut rod, by design, right? I don't know why I'm asking, of course this has to be the case to facilitate..... turning..... I just wanted to hear someone else say it. This twisting motion is extremely difficult to do by hand, much more work than the (albeit, shot worn and 120k miles) OE. There are no binds or kinks with regards to the swivel motion, the axial bearing appears to be doing its thing - though like I said, manipulating the rotation by hand is extremely difficult compared to the OE.
 
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