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Discussion Starter #1
What's the best shop jack to use with the M5? Specifically, I'm looking for something that easily clears a lowered M5.

A number of months ago someone posted a pic of what they considered to be the best jack to use. Did a search but I can't find it.

Any advice? cherrsagai

Jeff
 

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x703jko said:
What's the best shop jack to use with the M5? Specifically, I'm looking for something that easily clears a lowered M5.

A number of months ago someone posted a pic of what they considered to be the best jack to use. Did a search but I can't find it.

Any advice? cherrsagai

Jeff

Look at AC Hydraulic Jacks, check your height, you will want to be above the 3.1" clearance.
 

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Talking about jacks. How do you guys jack up the car and put the car in jack stands. Do you use the jack pad to jack the car up and use the jack stand elsewhere or jack up the car from another jack point and use the jack pads for the stands? Where is a good jack point besides the jack pads?
 

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x703jko said:
What's the best shop jack to use with the M5? Specifically, I'm looking for something that easily clears a lowered M5.
As for race jacks, you can spend ~$600 for a NASCAR-grade Made-in-the-USA, CNC machined from billet Aluminum by Brunnhoelzl. They weigh about ~32lbs and reach full height at three pumps.

Or, if you're a cheap [email protected] like me, you pay ~$120 for a cheap imported knock-off from Harbor Freight or even Sears Craftsman.

I've been taking my cheapie aluminum race jack to the track for over a year, and it hasn't failed me yet. And BTW, my Beast rides pretty low.

-Dave
 

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Discussion Starter #7

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x703jko said:
I'll check it out. Griot's Garage also has a nice Al jack.

Not as pricey as the one you mentioned.
Well, if Griot's offers one for $450, then I'd bet a paycheck you can find the exact same model elsewhere for about $225...

Kinda like their $76 Ultimate Hose Nozzle made out of brass and stainless that I found for $30 at the Eastwood Company www.eastwoodco.com .

FWIW, I got mine from Harbor Freight, but I've noticed that Sears began offering them in recent months....
 

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i bought an Al jack that looks similar to the unit in the griots catologue from Sears about 6 mos ago. $199, works nicely, lifts quickly.
Mike
 

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Teutonaddict said:
As for race jacks, you can spend ~$600 for a NASCAR-grade Made-in-the-USA, CNC machined from billet Aluminum by Brunnhoelzl. They weigh about ~32lbs and reach full height at three pumps.

Or, if you're a cheap [email protected] like me, you pay ~$120 for a cheap imported knock-off from Harbor Freight or even Sears Craftsman.

I've been taking my cheapie aluminum race jack to the track for over a year, and it hasn't failed me yet. And BTW, my Beast rides pretty low.

-Dave
Yes! The best jack around; my jack;

 

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AC jacks are quite good, both in terms of quality & low pick-up height. The are offered by ASE (Auto Service Eqt.) in CT, I think, among others. The only negative comment I would have is that the composite wheels in the front are not real tolerant of impact loads (i.e., they break when dropped).

I have various aluminum "race jacks" and use them at the track, but I do not like to use them in the shop. I don't consider the designed-in safety factor to be as high as with steel jacks intended for commercial shop use, and a byproduct of the quick-lift "pit stop" design is that it is hard to lower jack height slowly. Some of the more expensive import copycat floor jacks (100 pounds & up) seem to be decent quality, and are priced in the $80-$120 range but don't usually have low initial pad height. Don't waste your time or the quality of your work with the cheap parts store hydraulic floor jacks.

There have been past threads on jacking & jack stand placement - in "Tips" section I believe. Where you support the car once up in the air has a lot to do with what you are doing. Changing a clutch & flywheel would need different placement vs. doing front suspension work, for example.

IMO you should have two floor jacks to safely work on the E39 M5. This allows simultaneous jacking from each side at the front or rear lift points. The car is too stiff, and the heights needed are often sufficiently high that there is danger of the car tilting too much and slipping off the stands. It can be done with one jack, but I don't like doing this.

Not to insult anyone's intelligence, but you should not get under the car w/o jack stands in place for obvious reasons.

Regards, Dick Roberts
 

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RRoberts said:
AC jacks are quite good, both in terms of quality & low pick-up height. The are offered by ASE (Auto Service Eqt.) in CT, I think, among others. The only negative comment I would have is that the composite wheels in the front are not real tolerant of impact loads (i.e., they break when dropped).

I have various aluminum "race jacks" and use them at the track, but I do not like to use them in the shop. I don't consider the designed-in safety factor to be as high as with steel jacks intended for commercial shop use, and a byproduct of the quick-lift "pit stop" design is that it is hard to lower jack height slowly. Some of the more expensive import copycat floor jacks (100 pounds & up) seem to be decent quality, and are priced in the $80-$120 range but don't usually have low initial pad height. Don't waste your time or the quality of your work with the cheap parts store hydraulic floor jacks.

There have been past threads on jacking & jack stand placement - in "Tips" section I believe. Where you support the car once up in the air has a lot to do with what you are doing. Changing a clutch & flywheel would need different placement vs. doing front suspension work, for example.

IMO you should have two floor jacks to safely work on the E39 M5. This allows simultaneous jacking from each side at the front or rear lift points. The car is too stiff, and the heights needed are often sufficiently high that there is danger of the car tilting too much and slipping off the stands. It can be done with one jack, but I don't like doing this.

Not to insult anyone's intelligence, but you should not get under the car w/o jack stands in place for obvious reasons.

Regards, Dick Roberts
This info is spot on! In the shop you should use a steel jack not a race jack as the race jack is not intended to be used for general service. Most steel jacks have a wide footprint and the race jacks do not. I have 4 floor jacks. 2 "cheap" aluminum jacks one steel jack and a Craftsman aluminum jack. The Craftsman jack is a very high quality jack. It is made from billet and is not cast in any area that is structural. Compared to the Harbor Frieght jack, the Craftsman is clearly the better jack. The 2 "cheap" jacks are HF jacks and I have seen them break on the pad and on the lifting arm itself. I only use these jacks for light duty work as they are only rated for 3000lbs. The Craftsman is rated at 4000lbs and the steel jack is rated at 7000lbs.

Not an area to compromise you safety. I also looked at the thread on where to place jack stands and I can tell you I would be leary of some of the points that were recomended. Frame rails are generaly good points to place a stand. You do run the risk of removing the undercoating so be aware of this. To keep this to a minimum I coat the top of my stands with "plastic dip". I also use very wide stands with base plates on the feet. I bought them at Sams Club and they are the Goodyear stands. They are a bargain so I bought six! Very good quality.

Jordan
 

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Discussion Starter #13
RRoberts said:
AC jacks are quite good, both in terms of quality & low pick-up height. The are offered by ASE (Auto Service Eqt.) in CT, I think, among others. The only negative comment I would have is that the composite wheels in the front are not real tolerant of impact loads (i.e., they break when dropped).

I have various aluminum "race jacks" and use them at the track, but I do not like to use them in the shop. I don't consider the designed-in safety factor to be as high as with steel jacks intended for commercial shop use, and a byproduct of the quick-lift "pit stop" design is that it is hard to lower jack height slowly. Some of the more expensive import copycat floor jacks (100 pounds & up) seem to be decent quality, and are priced in the $80-$120 range but don't usually have low initial pad height. Don't waste your time or the quality of your work with the cheap parts store hydraulic floor jacks.

There have been past threads on jacking & jack stand placement - in "Tips" section I believe. Where you support the car once up in the air has a lot to do with what you are doing. Changing a clutch & flywheel would need different placement vs. doing front suspension work, for example.

IMO you should have two floor jacks to safely work on the E39 M5. This allows simultaneous jacking from each side at the front or rear lift points. The car is too stiff, and the heights needed are often sufficiently high that there is danger of the car tilting too much and slipping off the stands. It can be done with one jack, but I don't like doing this.

Not to insult anyone's intelligence, but you should not get under the car w/o jack stands in place for obvious reasons.

Regards, Dick Roberts
Dick. Excellent advice. I never would have focused on the safety issue. But, you have me thinking that I should stay away from the Al jack. Also, I get your point about needing two jacks.

I'll check out AC.

Jeff :cheers:
 

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Lscman said:
A premium 2T billet aluminum Goodyear jack is sold at Sam's Club. It is a super heavy duty unit & under $150.
It's not billet. The lifting arm is cast. And I think the brand is Crew Line???

I have the 1.5 ton and it is also cast. The only billet jack I know of that is 2 ton and under 200.00 is the Craftsman.

Jordan

4 floor jacks......
 

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jordantii said:
It's not billet. The lifting arm is cast. And I think the brand is Crew Line???

I have the 1.5 ton and it is also cast. The only billet jack I know of that is 2 ton and under 200.00 is the Craftsman.

Jordan

4 floor jacks......
I have been to Sears a couple times in the last month, so maybe I'm confusing what I saw where. In any event, sounds like the jack you saw at Sam's was a std 1.5T Chinese jack sold everywhere. This Harbor Freight clone is junk. Sam's may sell more than one jack, I'm not sure...but I thought it was 2T forged.
 

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Lscman said:
I have been to Sears a couple times in the last month, so maybe I'm confusing what I saw where. In any event, sounds like the jack you saw at Sam's was a std 1.5T Chinese jack sold everywhere. This Harbor Freight clone is junk. Sam's may sell more than one jack, I'm not sure...but I thought it was 2T forged.
They do have a 2ton jack it's just a bit beefier than the 1.5 ton jack. It is pretty much a clone of the HF jack.

I really like the Craftsman jack for the money I don't think it can be beat.

Jordan
 
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