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Discussion Starter #1
A bit of a long shot here but here we go:

I'm in the process of designing a few accent pieces for the fog light covers and the diffuser. I'm going to make these out of aluminum but will paint them charcoal gray, just enough to hint that there's something going on in there.

Now, my father has access to an industrial-type oven which he uses to work with metals. He suggested the possibility of perhaps baking the paint to improve the finish and durability.

The thing is, we have no idea about the process. Does it depend on the paint? How long and at what temperature should they be baked? Is it even literal baking or is it a different process?

I'm flying blind at this point so any point in the right direction would be good.

:cheers:
 

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A bit of a long shot here but here we go:

I'm in the process of designing a few accent pieces for the fog light covers and the diffuser. I'm going to make these out of aluminum but will paint them charcoal gray, just enough to hint that there's something going on in there.

Now, my father has access to an industrial-type oven which he uses to work with metals. He suggested the possibility of perhaps baking the paint to improve the finish and durability.

The thing is, we have no idea about the process. Does it depend on the paint? How long and at what temperature should they be baked? Is it even literal baking or is it a different process?

I'm flying blind at this point so any point in the right direction would be good.

:cheers:
I would think talking to a company like Sikkens or Dow Corning would be a good start.

Interesting project. Good luck.
Salty.
 

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Just read the detailed specifications for the paint systems you are using- they will detail curing conditions and allowable variants.

Specs will also describe durability, UV resistance, gloss retention, etc.

I've been doing some architectural metal with a two part epoxy primer and then a two part Polyurethane/ester top coat. HVLP application. But that is many gallons, and not a high gloss finish. Plus it is big stuff outside so no oven.

IMHO, the epoxy primer is ideal for underbody/frame restoration...FWIW.
 

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For those items and at less than 150F I'd leave it in there for no longer than 30 minutes.

Disclaimer: Times will vary based on make and model of your oven ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Sweet. Thanks for the tips!

I'll let you know how it works out. If not, then powder coating will have to do.
 
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