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I was just curious if someone knew where Alpina derived their B numbers from...if there was any method to the madness? Do I assume that "B" stands for Bovensiepen? My only other guess would be "Buchloe".

Early B7 turbos were both 5 and 6 series and both cars also had B9 and B10 models. Were these at all similar to BMW "E" numbers that they were consecutive "projects" that became production cars?

cb
 

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As I recall, the numbers were originally associated to the engines, rather than the chassis. However, my knowledge is limited. The Unofficial Alpina Homepage has a lot of historical info - you should look it up.
 

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It has to do with the engine designations...

A are the 4-cilinder engines (inline 4) which led to the A1, A2, A3, A4, etc
B are the M30 engines (inline 6) which led to the B2(S), B5, B6 2.8, B7 Turbo, B8, B9 3.5, B10 3.5, B11 3.5, etc
C are the M20 engines (inline 6) which led to the C1 2.3, C1 2.5, C2 2.5, C2 2.7, etc

This was followed pretty strictly until the late 1980's... then we had a variety of other model designations which didn't follow this tradition, e.g. B12, B10 BiTurbo, B10 4.0, B10 4.6, B3 3.0, B3 3.2, B8 4.6.
In the mid-2000's there was a structural change to linking the modelnumbering to BMW's modelnumbering (e.g. B3, D3, B5, B6, B7)

The other engine designations include:
D are the M70 engines (V12)
E are the M50 engines (inline 6)
F are the M60 engines (V8)
G(?) are the M47 engines (inline 4 diesel)
H are the N62 engines (V8 kompressor)
 

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Hi Kees,

I never thought I would be able to add information to one of your posts ;)

But there is also the B6 2.7 with the M20 engine (the car I had was supplied to Japan). I think it was called a B3 in Germany and a C2 in the rest of Europe but they might also have been a C2 in Germany at some point! Very confusing :dunno:

Cheers,
Bryn.
 

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Hi Kees,

I never thought I would be able to add information to one of your posts ;)

But there is also the B6 2.7 with the M20 engine (the car I had was supplied to Japan). I think it was called a B3 in Germany and a C2 in the rest of Europe but they might also have been a C2 in Germany at some point! Very confusing :dunno:

Cheers,
Bryn.
Hi Bryn,

That particular model is a story in itself. Essentially all 3 the models are pretty much identical specification.

The C2 2.7 was the most powerful E30 model sold via BMW dealers until the E30 M3 was introduced.
It was built by Alpina sourcing complete cars from BMW so quite expensive, significantly more than the E30 M3.
Alpina then managed to negotiate a deal with BMW where they were provided with half-built bodyshells thus reducing the costs of the production.
This model was then renamed the B3 2.7.
In Japan both the C2 2.7 and B3 2.7 were called the B6 2.7.

Best regards, Kees
 

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Hi Kees, I agree with all your explanations. But even I don't know why Alpina changed the name from B3 2.7 / C2 2.7 into B6 2.7 (for Japan). Either it was just to seperate the Japan- from the European-version or those cars do have some technical specs which other B3 / C2 did not have.

Just think about the B7 Turbo (E24/E28) which were sold with an automatic gearbox to Japan. You couldn't get these cars with automatic gearbox in Europe.

Kind regards,
Ralf
 
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