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http://www.m5board.com/vbulletin/showthread.php?t=111545

wow. extremely sad. looks like a new M3. take a look at the video. has new M3 rims.
 

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Driver was a freakin idiot and criminal.

Someone did a background check on all of them and found that 4 of them had multiple taffic violations and/or midemeanors.

http://forums.ocala.com/eve/forums/a/tpc/f/8651007465/m/7211086986/p/10

You get what you ask for...
I think you're being a little harsh. Of course he made some poor choices and the consequences were heavy, but I don't think he asked to get himself and his friends killed. He made a huge mistake and unfortunately is was fatal.
 

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Driver was a freakin idiot and criminal.
Really? With a name like "Lewisracing", you never broke the law? If your point was, more appropriately stated as "This wasn't the first time they were probably involved in risky driving...", it would be better received. We've all been 18 or 19, we've all made risky moves. Every person on this board who is what they say they are has likely gotten traffic tickets. None of us on this board died, however. Bad decision by teen driver? Yes. Excusable? No. Accident? YES.
 

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a terrible tragedy. What were they doing on the air strip at 3am?
 

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Ah the benefit of being 52, or the ability to live long enough to realize how lucky I have been given the risks I've taken.

At 18 or 19 most, if not all of us, who are into cars have this aura of invincibility and like was mentioned above have taken risks that today we would shake our heads at.

I recall taking out my Dad's cars (Trans AM, custom V8 MGB) without his permission on public roads and racing flat out with a friend in the car. Stupid? You bet. Lucky? I'll say. But back then while I thought I understood the risks, I really didn't since I truly believed that I could handle it. Would my father have condoned this? No way - he had no idea.

The bottom line is that this kid made a mistake on a public road with friends on board. A lethal mistake. Was it criminal, most likely not unless his father approved of his use of the M5.

He didn't get what he asked for since I'm sure he didn't ask to die.

If there is fault here beyond the obvious, it is in my mind with a parent that would knowingly put such horsepower into the hands of the inexperienced.

Unlike Lewisracing with tons of track time this young man apparently did not have the experience and car control to handle such a vehicle, and that negligence is borne by the parents, if indeed they approved his use of such a vehicle.

I own two 500 hp cars and my teenagers (3) have never driven them and they know that if they were to touch them they'd be in deep sh**. Are they good drivers? Yup. But not good enough to be let loose with an M6 or even a more sedate sl55.

There is a lot more that we will find out over the coming days (toxicology, parental permission, etc.). It is very tragic, but I can't begin to imagine being the parent of this boy. :sad1:

For a brief few moments it made me think seriously of selling my cars, wondering if my luck will run out based on some of the stuff we all do on public roads. We all speed - we love these cars. We take chances - because we feel we can handle the risk and we have experience. As we get older we tend to pick our spots to minimize the risks. Todays cars are mind blowingly fast, and when trouble hits its going to be too fast to react for most drivers, let alone the inexperienced.
 

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Ah the benefit of being 52, or the ability to live long enough to realize how lucky I have been given the risks I've taken.

At 18 or 19 most, if not all of us, who are into cars have this aura of invincibility and like was mentioned above have taken risks that today we would shake our heads at.

I recall taking out my Dad's cars (Trans AM, custom V8 MGB) without his permission on public roads and racing flat out with a friend in the car. Stupid? You bet. Lucky? I'll say. But back then while I thought I understood the risks, I really didn't since I truly believed that I could handle it. Would my father have condoned this? No way - he had no idea.

The bottom line is that this kid made a mistake on a public road with friends on board. A lethal mistake. Was it criminal, most likely not unless his father approved of his use of the M5.

He didn't get what he asked for since I'm sure he didn't ask to die.

If there is fault here beyond the obvious, it is in my mind with a parent that would knowingly put such horsepower into the hands of the inexperienced.

Unlike Lewisracing with tons of track time this young man apparently did not have the experience and car control to handle such a vehicle, and that negligence is borne by the parents, if indeed they approved his use of such a vehicle.

I own two 500 hp cars and my teenagers (3) have never driven them and they know that if they were to touch them they'd be in deep sh**. Are they good drivers? Yup. But not good enough to be let loose with an M6 or even a more sedate sl55.

There is a lot more that we will find out over the coming days (toxicology, parental permission, etc.). It is very tragic, but I can't begin to imagine being the parent of this boy. :sad1:

For a brief few moments it made me think seriously of selling my cars, wondering if my luck will run out based on some of the stuff we all do on public roads. We all speed - we love these cars. We take chances - because we feel we can handle the risk and we have experience. As we get older we tend to pick our spots to minimize the risks. Todays cars are mind blowingly fast, and when trouble hits its going to be too fast to react for most drivers, let alone the inexperienced.
Very well said. I t was dark and they were probably trying to hit a certain speed before hitting the brakes. When you go to airport runways with groups, they always set up the braking points, and thats in the daytime.

Sad story
 

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Ah the benefit of being 52, or the ability to live long enough to realize how lucky I have been given the risks I've taken.

At 18 or 19 most, if not all of us, who are into cars have this aura of invincibility and like was mentioned above have taken risks that today we would shake our heads at.

I recall taking out my Dad's cars (Trans AM, custom V8 MGB) without his permission on public roads and racing flat out with a friend in the car. Stupid? You bet. Lucky? I'll say. But back then while I thought I understood the risks, I really didn't since I truly believed that I could handle it. Would my father have condoned this? No way - he had no idea.

The bottom line is that this kid made a mistake on a public road with friends on board. A lethal mistake. Was it criminal, most likely not unless his father approved of his use of the M5.

He didn't get what he asked for since I'm sure he didn't ask to die.

If there is fault here beyond the obvious, it is in my mind with a parent that would knowingly put such horsepower into the hands of the inexperienced.

Unlike Lewisracing with tons of track time this young man apparently did not have the experience and car control to handle such a vehicle, and that negligence is borne by the parents, if indeed they approved his use of such a vehicle.

I own two 500 hp cars and my teenagers (3) have never driven them and they know that if they were to touch them they'd be in deep sh**. Are they good drivers? Yup. But not good enough to be let loose with an M6 or even a more sedate sl55.

There is a lot more that we will find out over the coming days (toxicology, parental permission, etc.). It is very tragic, but I can't begin to imagine being the parent of this boy. :sad1:

For a brief few moments it made me think seriously of selling my cars, wondering if my luck will run out based on some of the stuff we all do on public roads. We all speed - we love these cars. We take chances - because we feel we can handle the risk and we have experience. As we get older we tend to pick our spots to minimize the risks. Todays cars are mind blowingly fast, and when trouble hits its going to be too fast to react for most drivers, let alone the inexperienced.
Very well said. I t was dark and they were probably trying to hit a certain speed before hitting the brakes. When you go to airport runways with groups, they always set up the braking points, and thats in the daytime. I usually donb't put anybody in the car when I am driving fast, and I don't drvie

Sad story
 

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Well they were trying to do something and as ot said they thought they knew wat they were doing but they didnt. the driver made a huge mistake and he and the other 4 in his car paid with their lives.
 

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Ah the benefit of being 52, or the ability to live long enough to realize how lucky I have been given the risks I've taken.
We've all been lucky, but that does not mean the dangerous things we did at the time were necessarily wrong despite being very risky. They are part of who we were and have become.

Sometimes - rarely but tragically - when things go terribly wrong, it is natural to say that it just wasn't worth it. But you can't look at it that way.

This non-moralistic fact was really impressed upon me in Aspen this last week where, besides skiing, I watched the Winter X Games. By normal standards, the athletes there are completely insane. Despite their incredible talent and abilities, many do get hurt, some seriously, and a few fatally. But that's who/what they are.

On the other hand, I completely agree with you about (not) handing the keys of my M cars to my kids. They can become who/what they are on their own dime and their own responsibility.

Tom
 

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i just spent the better part of an hour reading through all the posts regarding this tragedy. member "americanM5" or "josh" and his passengers sadly are gone. i didn't know them but my condolensces goes out to their families and loved ones. i will be the first one to admit when i was his age, i made numerous mistakes that could of resulted in the same outcome, luckily, they didn't. i was just luckier. but just to go off topic, i must say, while i was reading this post it felt like the song by eminem called stan...for those younger board members you should know exactly what im talking about. i read his posts regarding rough shifts, i thought to myself like many others a 500hp vehicle in the hands of a barely post pubescent kid is bad news. then i read further, i saw the back and forth comments from him to other members and vice-versa, i thought, wow! i remember when i had my e36 m3 at 16 and how i use to get those comments at my local shop in so-cal from the other "older customers"....i hated it at the time and didn't realise the wisdom behind their insults or sarcasms. now i do, and it's just a shame that josh will never get a chance to understand this fact. then i read the thread regarding "5 killed in M5 crash" as i read further into the news reports the lyrics from stan suddenly hit me, "Come to think about, his name was..(josh) it was you, Damn!".....anybody else get that eerie feeling?

R.I.P. to all those involed.
 

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So much outpouring of heartfelt emotions from us on this board.

I thought I read, somewhere, that there were skid marks and that the car was sideways when it left the runway. Besides the obvious speed issue could that be an indication that the DSC was "off" and contributed to this?

Something that we all might gain from this is to leave that button alone unless in a highly controlled environment. There are references occasionally to disengaging the DSC in traffic. Not good.
 
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