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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey Guys,

I've searched the threads but I haven't found anything on clear headlight covers to protect freshly polished/restored headlights... so here it goes.

I stopped by a professional automotive window tint shop and found out that they provide headlamp restoration services. This basically includes sanding down the headlight covers with sandpaper and applying a polish. I'm not sure exactly which one but I was told that they use a 3M headlight restoration kit. This restoration process can be done for ~$60 dollars. They said that they apply some polish/uv protectant stuff so that it won't get 'foggy' again. My biggest concern is this: I heard that after a year or so, due to the sanding away of protectant coating/layer of the sanding/polishing process, that the headlamps will get 'foggy' quickly soon after and will need to be polished almost annually once after the polishing takes place.

I spoke to the tint shop guys and they told me that I can apply the 3M material used for the clear bra process to cover the headlights to prevent it from more rock chips and the foggy/faded look. Has anyone thought of or tried this? Is this a good idea? I figured that this could be a good way of maintaining that clean look of the headlights longer... Let me know your thoughts!

Thanks guys!
 

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1. You could do the restoration process yourself. It is easy to do with a few different grits of sandpaper, medium and extra fine cut polish, and either a rotary polisher or a Mother's Powerball and a drill. I have used both and they both work quite well.

2. There are a lot of different headlight protection films out there like LaminX, 3M, and headlight armor. I am using the 3M on my car and it's not the clear bra film, it is pre-cut film specifically for headlights but any window tint person can install it. It's a MUST if you do the headlight restoration, along with a coat or two of good quality sealant or wax (I prefer sealant on the headlights).
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
1. You could do the restoration process yourself. It is easy to do with a few different grits of sandpaper, medium and extra fine cut polish, and either a rotary polisher or a Mother's Powerball and a drill. I have used both and they both work quite well.

2. There are a lot of different headlight protection films out there like LaminX, 3M, and headlight armor. I am using the 3M on my car and it's not the clear bra film, it is pre-cut film specifically for headlights but any window tint person can install it. It's a MUST if you do the headlight restoration, along with a coat or two of good quality sealant or wax (I prefer sealant on the headlights).
Thanks for your response.

How long have you had the 3M headlight cover? Any signs of wear? Does it age well? Should I expect to replace the covers every once in a while still or should it be a pretty 'permanent' solution? Sorry for bombarding you with all the questions. :biggrin:
 

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I have Stonguard on my M5 headlights and its a great product. Very thick and protective and still very clear. No UV fogging, and its been at least 3 years in my ownership in Hawaii sun. I also have used Menzerna products on my other BMWs to polish the plastic, and yes you do need to use film to prevent it from happening again over time. On my Z3 and X I chose Lamin-X, but seeing them side by side I much prefer the Stonguard. Lamin X never had the clarity that Stonguard has and its not as thick or protective.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I have Stonguard on my M5 headlights and its a great product. Very thick and protective and still very clear. No UV fogging, and its been at least 3 years in my ownership in Hawaii sun. I also have used Menzerna products on my other BMWs to polish the plastic, and yes you do need to use film to prevent it from happening again over time. On my Z3 and X I chose Lamin-X, but seeing them side by side I much prefer the Stonguard. Lamin X never had the clarity that Stonguard has and its not as thick or protective.
Cool. Thanks for your input!
 

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The difference in using the same film as they use on the hood, fenders, mirrors etc versus the headlight specific film is that the headlight specific film is much thicker. Initially the thicker film was for the older glass headlights to help prevent them from breaking when a rock hit them. The newer plastic covered headlights will take much more punishment from rocks and will not break or crack, for the most part. When I installed my new euro headlights with clear corners I wanted to protect them from wear and pitting to keep them looking new. I had the the same thickness of film from my hood, bumpers ets installed on my headlights and have had no issues with any flying objects puncture through the film and I have had mine on 7 years now with minimal wear. You can go with either thickness but the thicker stuff would for sure give you better protection. Also, there is a newer technology film that came out in the last year or two that resists staining from bugs. Call this guy if you want any info or you could ask him if he would send you out a set for your headlights. Speedfilm 678-249-7165 David. Web site: speedfilm.net
 

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Thanks for your response.

How long have you had the 3M headlight cover? Any signs of wear? Does it age well? Should I expect to replace the covers every once in a while still or should it be a pretty 'permanent' solution? Sorry for bombarding you with all the questions. :biggrin:
No problem. I've had the film for about a year and it still looks like new. Very clear, you can't tell it's on the headlight until you get close enough to see the edge of the film on the top. Very durable product and I highly recommend it.
 
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