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Discussion Starter #1
Sorry if this has already been covered on here and there is already a thread I can reference. I just joined the forum today (0109/20) and do have a good command of the web site yet.

I bought a 2006 M5 with a blown engine. I bought a replacement engine from an 2010 M5.

I noticed the car wire harness and 2006 engine wire harness have a blue plug which plug into eachother. See attached picture.

The 2010 engine wire harness does not have the blue plug. See attached picture.

So now I need to decide:
1) Do I use the 2010 engine wire harness and plug nothing into the blue plug on the car wire harness?
- or -
2) Do I try remove the wire harness from the 2006 engine and install it on the replacement 2010 engine before I install it in the car so the wiring between the engine and the car is 1-to-1?

If there are some threads about this already, please refer to them. Thank you.

Henry
 

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I would go for the second option, but I'd check before take the wiring harness off the 2006 engine, if all connecting points on the 2010 engine are the same. If there is nothing plugged in to the blue plug, it will cause problems because it's there for a reason..

I wanted to place a new thead for a question I have, perhaps you know the answer because I have the same plan as you have. I've bought a '07 e63 M6 (accident car) which I am taking apart. I am parting out the car, keep the engine and SMG and sell all other parts. Then, I'll buy a e60-e61 m5 with damaged engine and replace it with the good one from the e63 accident car. What do I need to keep with the engine to make it run in the other car? Do I need to keep the original ECU with the engine to make it start in the other car (or more modules/items)? Or can I just take out a broken S85 out of a e60-e61 m5 and place the other one in place?

Sorry for placing a question in your tread and if you'd like to, I'll remove it!
 

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Check the wiring for the plug on newtis. The plug will have some number like X1006 and you will be able to see what it goes to. Switching harnesses will be labor intensive and you will likely damage some plugs.
 

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I know Jim has mentioned those before. If memory is right that connector is for EGT thermocouples that were no longer installed in 07+ cars. Since you'll be keeping the 2006 ECU you'll need all the sensors that your ECU expects. If so your best bet is to keep your 06 harness with the new engine.
 

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I had my early 06 motor replaced by a late 07 motor by BMW back in 2014, and I remember something in the invoice about some type of exhaust plug being different and having to re-pin a connector or connectors, and they ended up re-using my modified 06 harness. I can check out the invoice again if you want to see if it gives any specifics.
 

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#2 is extra work but the way to do it correctly, especially if you don't want to do any repinning. Buy one of those 4 piece pick sets from harbor freight to help release the hard shell connector retaining tabs. I have a '10 engine that I pulled and refreshing it since it seems every major gasket had a decent amount of seepage. You may also see that alot of the clips and plastic insulation is a bit fragile, especially the part of the harness that goes to the alternator since it kinda runs by the driver's side exhaust manifold. While you are removing the harness, you may want to put higher quality thermal insulation around that.
 

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I wanted to place a new thead for a question I have, perhaps you know the answer because I have the same plan as you have. I've bought a '07 e63 M6 (accident car) which I am taking apart. I am parting out the car, keep the engine and SMG and sell all other parts. Then, I'll buy a e60-e61 m5 with damaged engine and replace it with the good one from the e63 accident car. What do I need to keep with the engine to make it run in the other car? Do I need to keep the original ECU with the engine to make it start in the other car (or more modules/items)? Or can I just take out a broken S85 out of a e60-e61 m5 and place the other one in place?
Mechanically the newer S85 should work exactly as the old one. As I understand the original ECU, CAS, and keys are all married together. I would just keep the original ECU with the old car. I think the only consideration is the old ECU will be adapted to the old throttle actuators, so you will have to perform an adaptation of the more recent throttle actuators so that the original ECU knows the position of the throttle. Not sure about BMW's engine control strategy but on with some other manufacturers, the ECU may need to relearn the position of the crank.
 

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Ah good call on the adaptations. The TAs have no adaptations, but plenty of other stuff does (vanos, crank, fuel, timing, etc.). No biggie if you don't have software to reset adaptations tho, ecu will learn the new engine over a few hundred miles.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thank you for all the replies. This is my first M5 and I am excited about it. I have owned a BMW 525i E34 M50. It had engine problems so I swapped an S50 engine into it. My next car which is my current car is a 1997 BMW 740i. I bought it with a blown engine at 90K miles and swapped in a replacement engine with 80K miles on it. I just turned over 140K miles on the car after driving it for several years - 7 to 10. Those engine swaps were relatively easy because for several reasons including:
1.) more room under hood.
2.) no engine wire harness differences.
3.) ECU not programmed to ignition.

KevinBoer, don't worry about posting your questions/concerns in this thread. It is not a problem. That is point of this forum - to help each other out with car problems. My understanding is that the ECU is programmed to the cars ignition in order to start the car. So the thing to do is keep the ECU from the car with the car if at all possible. Otherwise you will have to have the ECU reprogrammed to the cars ignition.

Alan Arnesen, thank you for the reply. I will remove the engine harness from the 2006 engine and install it on the 2010 donor engine. I checked out newTis.com. That was not helpful to me because I have difficulty comprehending wiring diagrams. Plus I had trouble finding the diagram(s) specific to the engine harness. I understand it will be labor intensive. But that is what I signed up for. I could have paid several thousand more for a car that had no problems but chose to purchase this one with a blown engine and swap in the donor engine with 52K miles. But I chose the sweat equity route.

I bought some electronic parts cleaner. So I hope that will free up some of the connectors and prevent them from breaking.

flacoramos, it sounds like the difference between the engines and engine wire harnesses is presence of exhaust gas thermal (EGT) sensors in the 2006 that the 2010 does not have. I will remove the engine harness from the 2006 engine and install it on the 2010 donor engine. Does anyone know where the EGT sensors are located on the engine? I am guessing in the exhaust headers. If that the case I should swap the exhaust headers too so the sensors are present and feeding the inputs on the ECU. I will be working on the swap in my garage tomorrow. I will do a visual check for the presence of the EGT sensors on the 2006 engine and absense of them on the 2010 engine.

texsn95, You can check for specifics if you would have spare time. But I would not expect there to be much detailed information on the invoice. But I would like to know what they said on there if there are any specific details. You can never be too sure.

gmtegear, I agree swapping the engine wire harness from the 2006 engine to the 2010 engine is the way to go. Like I said before I am in this project for value through sweat equity. Thanks for the tip about the 4 piece pick set from Harbor Freight to help preserve the connectors. I like the idea of better insulating the engine wire harness that goes to the alternator. Can you recommend what insulating material to use and where I may get some?

The ECU from the 2006 car has a tune in it from Evolve. So I have no interest in reinventing that wheel and paying for new ECU and/or programming. Not to mention that it is already paired with the car and ignition to start the car.

As for the adaptions, I am glad to hear the ECU will 'learn' them. Again I have no interest in paying for an new ECU and/or programming. As long as it causes no engine damage during the 'learning' period I am good.

I did a little computer research on RealOEM. It shows the exhaust temperature sensor (BMW part #
11787836452) for the 2006 engine.
www.realoem.com/bmw/enUS/showparts?id=NB93-USA-02-2006-E60-BMW-M5&diagId=18_0577.

But it shows the exhaust temperature sensor greyed out for the 2010 engine. And the part # is omitted from the list.

This supports my theory that switching the exhaust headers too will provide the sensors needed by the 2006 engine wire harness and ECU.
 

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I agree swapping the engine wire harness from the 2006 engine to the 2010 engine is the way to go. Like I said before I am in this project for value through sweat equity. Thanks for the tip about the 4 piece pick set from Harbor Freight to help preserve the connectors. I like the idea of better insulating the engine wire harness that goes to the alternator. Can you recommend what insulating material to use and where I may get some?

The ECU from the 2006 car has a tune in it from Evolve. So I have no interest in reinventing that wheel and paying for new ECU and/or programming. Not to mention that it is already paired with the car and ignition to start the car.

As for the adaptions, I am glad to hear the ECU will 'learn' them. Again I have no interest in paying for an new ECU and/or programming. As long as it causes no engine damage during the 'learning' period I am good.
There are a variety of heat shielding products that you can use. Alot of them are designed to be placed over existing wire insulation or tubes. Here is an interesting selection of a variety of products.
Heatshield Products at Summit Racing

Most of the work will be in the valley of the V. You will find years with of dirt and debris. Hygiene is important as some of this dirt, dust, and grease will cake up around some of your old connectors. All the connectors under the hood are "sealed" hard shell connectors, meaning there is a rubber gasket of some sort to help resist water and dirt intrusion. Since most of your connectors have never been removed, they may require considerable pulling force to remove once the release tab is released. It is important to clean off and clean out that dirt and dust around the connector when you reinsert the connectors, that dirt will cause excess friction when you try to remove it again and allows more dirt and moisture to bypass the seal and can cause corrosion and intermittent connects with those circuits. Fault connections cause all sorts of hard to solve warning lights and flaky operation. I recommend you wash and degrease the entire harness AND DO NOT THROW IT AROUND. You may be tempted to throw it around (like in the back of a pickup truck) or let part of it drag on the floor. This is huge mistake, the hard shell connectors are not designed to survive stuff like that and BMW spec plastics means that it is brittle. The connectors to the coils and VANOS actuators in particular are prone to damage as likely someone before you has messed with it. Some of them are broken on mine.

Also take alot of pictures to make sure you (re)route the harness correctly, and consider labling with maksing tape. For example the VANOS connectors it is easy to reverse the intake and exhaust

This can sound like one of those "while you are in there" rabbit holes, but given you are already removing the wire harness and unplugging the connectors, it makes sense to replace several things:
1) the starter, it is mounted in the V usually the only way to unbolt the starter is dropping the transmission to access 2 of the bolts. There are 3 total, but I recall you can only get at 2 of them by removing the trans. Valeo is the OE and you can get these from for like $250. Or pay 2-3x and get the same thing but with the BMW sticker somewhere.

There are several people over the years who have reported intermittent no start issues, some believe it may be the starter. The root cause is unclear from what I have read, but someone may chime in otherwise. People believe it is a loose or bad connection from the starter cable or solenoid terminal. In any event ensure those connections are tight and clean.

IMHO it makes no sense to leave an old starter in there that has like 75k+ miles while you have the engine out and plenty of easy access to the V. It will cost far more than $250 in labor (or your own time) down the road to change out the starter.

2) Throttle Actuators. They are known to go bad after several years of service. It is a known design issue that lacks durability. The gears wear out and there are some suspect circuit board issues that also cause problems. Consider taking the existing set you have that is with the uninstalled engine, and sending them out to get rebuilt. I believe there is a guy on here name Abdul in Michigan that rebuilds these and has a lifetime warranty for around $300 each. Contrast that with brand new ones that cost around 1k and you need two. Again these are in the V and you will need to disconnect the wiring on them anyways. If the ones in the "newer" or "older" engine were already rebuilt, they will have a sticker on them.

There are also IDLE actuators too, but these seem to fail less often and I'm not sure what the actual failure mode is with them, it could be excessive carbon build up. These end up being costly too, but I'd not replace them at this point.

As far as adaptations go, it shouldn't be much of a problem, but don't expect it run perfectly upon start up. The ECM needs to know a few things around what it is controlling, one of them being the throttle as that is the key determining factor for everything else. There are logical safeguards built into the control strategy, but those can be by passed by someone (often times unknowingly). You have a different "tune" which really means that someone altered the values for several tables so the engine behaves a bit differently. There are short term and long term tables that control the fueling of the engine to target a certain value. Those were for your "old" engine, your "new" engine will be slightly different. It can be due to varying amounts of carbon deposits, but it could be that your MAF calibration is way out of whack, but this is problem for anyone who has a remote tune. Your best bet to rule out MAF issues is to keep the same intake tract as you had before.

While you can run in to some performance or emissions issues, it should self correct over time unless "the tune" has dramatically altered certain parameters.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
There were 100's of products on the web site. I did not know were to begin. But if any one knows of a specific product for the starter cable that would be great.

I will make sure the started cable connections are tight and clean.

The donor engine and transmission have 52K miles so I will not replace any of the other items at this time.

I was hoping the engine/transmission swap would be plug and play. But too many differences between the 2006 and 2010 model. The wires from the car (to engine and transmission ECUs and harnesses) is different. The engine wire harness is different. The transmission wire harness is different. There is even an extra sensor on the 2006 exhaust header that the 2010 does not have. I do not even think I can use the newer transmission. I think I have to move the engine wire harness, transmission, transmission wire harness, and the exhaust headers from the 'old' engine to the 'new' one in order for this project to be successful. It is more work than I had anticipated. But hopefully worth it.

Thank you for all the help. Back to the garage for another work session...
 

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The only difference is the egt sensors. No need to swap headers, just move the sensors. I can't recall if the egt harness is separate from the main harness. Chances are it's integrated so you're stuck swapping harnesses or tearing up the old one to get the egt section out. There are no other differences between years. What else are you seeing? Post pics.

Good advice on the starter, depending on how much you can get a new one for. Everything else I wouldn't bother until they fail.
 

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The starter cable isn't really exposed to that much heat, it is the portion of the engine wire harness that goes down the driver side of the block towards the alternator. It is a bit close to the driver's side exhaust manifold. I can upload a picture again of that portion of the wire harness where the protective insulation had degraded and started to expose the wire underneath. I have some extra thermal insulation from some prior stuff I did on other cars to shield the ABS sensor wires from heat from the rotors since I did alot of track driving with that car. It's basically 3/8" split loom sleeve that you can wrap around the wire. There are a ton of things you can use. Something like this will do fine. DEI Fire Wrap 3000 010477

52K is really low mileage, nice find. The starter replacement really does require the transmission to be dropped so I can't find a reason not to do it if your engine is out. You can get the starter from various sellers on eBay, search for Valeo 438188. I bought 2 of mine there for under $200 including shipping. It is brand new, not remanufactured. It's nice to occasionally pay a reasonable amount for otherwise normal replacement parts with no BMW tax.

The other part that requires the trans to be removed to access are the two PCV one way vents that are on the back of the driver's side cylinder head. Those can plug up and cause excessive crankcase pressure and then contribute to oil leaks in key areas like your front or rear main seal.

If you take care of those things (and rod bearings which can be done with engine in the car) there really is no reason why you would need to pull the engine for another 100-150k miles, which is actually not that long in terms of additional mileage, but the engine was never designed for high mileage durability.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Thank you for the helpful replies. All good advice.

I have to admit my mistake. I did not have to remove the exhaust headers. There is a third port on the them on my 2010 donor engine just like on the blown 2006 engine. I should have taken the third thermal sensors off the 'old' engine and moved them to the donor engine. That is going to cost me. The exhaust headers gaskets are $10 each and there are ten of them.

Also I previously said that the transmissions were not the same. That was because I thought part of the wire harness that goes into the thermal sensors were tied into the same harness. Upon further inspection they are not tied into each other. And the plugs for the transmission are exactly the same. I may still back off the transmission that came with the donor engine to check the clutch.

After all the advice about the starter I will install a new one. There is a Valeo for about $190 shipped.
www.ebay.com/itm/Valeo-438188-Starter-Motor-for-19015-16104-12-41-7-835-126-12-41-7-835-737-af/293327977544?_trkparms=aid%3D555021%26algo%3DPL.SIMRVI%26ao%3D1%26asc%3D20190711100440%26meid%3Dadb36f485b544376ba670ad784fdd9ed%26pid%3D100752%26rk%3D1%26rkt%3D12%26mehot%3Dpf%26sd%3D263902586235%26itm%3D293327977544%26pmt%3D1%26noa%3D0%26pg%3D2047675&_trksid=p2047675.c100752.m1982
There is also another brand for about $140 shipped.
www.ebay.com/itm/Starter-NEW-BMW-5-0L-M5-M6-2006-2007-2008-2009-2010-19015/263902586235?_trkparms=aid%3D555018%26algo%3DPL.SIM%26ao%3D1%26asc%3D20131003132420%26meid%3D8a52432f3a6c427caff567f0d6d73524%26pid%3D100005%26rk%3D5%26rkt%3D12%26mehot%3Dco%26sd%3D293327977544%26itm%3D263902586235%26pmt%3D1%26noa%3D0%26pg%3D2047675&_trksid=p2047675.c100005.m1851
Would you bother trying to save the $40 or just go with the Valeo brand?
So will I have to remove the transmission in order to replace the starter, even with the engine out?

Do you have the part # for the crankcase PCV valves?

Would you replace the rod bearings while the engine out in a 2010 engine with 52K miles?

If this car goes another 100K to 150K that would be great. My current car is a 1997 BMW 740i. I did the same thing with it - bought it with a blown engine at 90K miles and swapped in a donor engine. That was nearly ten years ago and it has 140K miles on it. I have a company car. The BMW stays in the garage except to go back and forth to the golf course, go shopping, some spirited street driving, and go on the occasional trip into the mountains where the BMWs really excel. It could last me a decade or two.
 

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Now that you mention your plans for the car then yes I'd take the opportunity to fix a few more things:
Do a SMG overhaul, see this:

Yes replace rod bearings and the vanos internal hose. No better time than now with engine out. Go with increased clearance bearings: BE is my personal preference. Stock con rod bolts are fine (and cheaper), they must be replaced.

For the starter I'd get a valeo from rockauto. $40 is nothing compared to other maintenance items. No need to separate the trans to replace the starter. But there's no access to the starter top bolt with engine in place. For in-car replacement the trans tail has to be literally dropped (not removed).

Are you aware of newtis? If not just google it, it will be your best friend.

For part numbers use realoem, again just google it. The two PCV valves at the back of the drivers head aren't accessible with engine in-place. Personally I wouldn't bother but it wouldn't hurt to change them.
 

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I'm also doing quite abit of work to mine to address known problematic issues so I don't have to deal with it later and parts are still available. I intend to keep a few of mine for a few decades and there have been plenty of other people that have worked on my cars before I owned them and alot of half-a** work done during the reassembly (missing or wrong bolts, zip ties, etc.)

Regarding rod bearings now, I recommend against that. I say this because this is a dilemma that I had faced early on with my '10 engine strip down. Your miles are also on the low side, get the new engine back in the car. Sounds like your engine and trans are already together, I'd assume on a pallet. If you do the bearings with engine out of the car, you will need to have the engine on an engine stand. Why? You will not be able to properly torque down the con rod caps if the engine is not mounted to anything to securely oppose the torque. Those con rod bolts end up getting torqued to 73-75 Nm (My torque angle meter logs the final torque as I achieved the target angle spec). With that amount of torque, if the engine is merely suspended by a chain or load leveler, etc, it is going to spin. It's also not the safest thing to work under and engine that is hanging from a chain. At many factories I've been to (GM, Ford, Honda, Nissan) the process of decking an engine is done with the engine hanging by a chain going down an assembly line, but decking an engine (installing misc stuff) is quite abit different than installing rod bearings. The other option is to just have the engine rest on a pallet of something upside down, but that's clearly going to damage your top side of the engine. I suggest to do the rod bearings later, while it is in the car mounted to the trans and the engine supported by a dedicated engine support frame.

I paid like $170 for my starters and there was no tax. I used one of those eBay 10% off coupons that come out periodically. I get alot of parts from Rockauto too it was the same price there but I was able to avoid sales tax by buying it on eBay last year.

I was just looking at some of my earlier pictures. I have to retract what I said earlier about no issues with the starter wiring. Actually this was a perfect example of the substandard specifications that BMW has made with the wiring harness insulation. The label says that the wire harness was delivered to BMW on May 7th, 2009. It is completely unacceptable that the black convolute protection has self destructed leaving only the insulation on 8 gauge red wire to protect from shorting against anything metal. No I don't trust the red wire insulation either because there are plenty documented instances where that the wire insulation also degrades leaving bare wire exposed. You can see the pretty BMW font on the Valeo sticker, that is what you'd get if you bought this from BMW.
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Here are some more pictures of BMW's piss poor wiring harness material specification. This is from a '10. This is what hooks up to the alternator -which has been removed in this pic, otherwise it would be right in your face. The engine mount bracket has also been removed. My '08 actually has same amount of miles and looks acceptable by comparison, it may be that in 2009 BMW started to implement more eco-friendly specs and pad their wallet so more M5 owners in the future would have to rebuild their cars.

934448


The PCV check valves are like $25, and you need two of them for that particular location, there are 2 more that are on the valve covers but those can be accessed quite easily. Given these are so inexpensive and you have easy access, I suggest to replace. Don't forget the orings that go with them also. The two in the black are them. Interesting to see that here, BMW decided to put thermal insulation over part of the hose...
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There are other things that I can say you may consider doing with engine and trans out. This is a can of worms though. I'd recommend taking a peek inside your bellhousing. Unfortunately you can't inspect the flywheel without removing the clutch, which then requires special tools dismount and reinstall properly. You can check to see that you don't have any slave cylinder leakage and if it's fine, you can also consider swapping the mounting studs now so that when you do have to replace that POS (within the next 50k miles), you don't have to drop the trans to do so. That said, it is extremely likely by 125k miles, you will have to replace the flywheel and clutch anyways, so maybe you just leave it alone...
 

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Discussion Starter #17
flacoramos,
I would like to replace the rod bearings with stock connector rod bearings, the vanos internal hose, and the starter before I reinstall the engine and put the car back together. I have an engine stand. Putting the engine on the stand requires taking off the transmission. I want to check the clutch, release arm, and pivot pin anyway. I would like to install one of those steel pivot pins for longevity. As gmtegear pointed out there are some special tools needed to get the transmission reinstalled. I have did a clutch jobs on my 1992 BMW 525i. The only special tool I needed was a clutch alignment tool. I wonder if that is the special tool he is referring to.

I am not sure which part # the vanos internal hose is and how to replace. Is it shown on RealOEM on this page:
www.realoem.com/bmw/enUS/showparts?id=NB93-USA-07-2009-E60-BMW-M5&diagId=11_3698#11367841784 ?

Replacing the starter should be relatively straight forward. I just ordered a new starter Valeo 438188.
www.ebay.com/itm/Starter-Motor-Valeo-438188/163202293530?epid=168823501&hash=item25ff9d5f1a:g:DYYAAOSw0~Rcp-N6

gmtegear,

I am also finding some questionable workmanship in my car from previous folks. It is not that difficult to put a bolt, bracket, etc back until it is time to replace the removed part. Seems to me that would be much easier than scouring the garage for the bolt, bracket. etc. or much easier than patching it up with the wrong bolt or worse using a zip tie or something.

Yes the replacement engine and transmission I bought are together on a pallet. I would like to do the rod bearing replacement and check the clutch and flywheel and put in one of those steel pivot pins. I have an engine stand. I have done a clutch job on my 1992 BMW 525i E34. Used a clutch alignment tool. Do you know what special tools are needed for this car?

Just ordered the replacement starter.

I would not mind replacing the PCV check valves at the back of the engine. Do you know the part # on those? I searched 'PCV' and 'check valve' on RealOEM.com but nothing.

I have a company car and will mainly be driving this car on weekends. I may take me 10 years to put another 75K miles on this 50K engine and transmission. So maybe not worry about it for now and replace bearings with engine in car.
 

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There are no special tools for a clutch job on this car. A plastic alignment tool comes in the luk clutch kit. And even if you didn't have one eye-balling the clutch discs/pressure plate alignment works just fine. If for some reason you plan on reusing your clutch be aware the clutch disc pair is balanced as a set and cannot be rotated with respect to each other (same with the pressure plates). Use paint to mark their alignment. Even better just replace the whole thing using the SMG overhaul I linked before, you don't want to pull the trans out in another 10-20k miles (SMGs seem to act up at 60-70k).

The internal vanos hose is #9:

And yes the PCV valves are #7 (which includes oring #8).

What do you mean by 'stock connector rod bearings'? The whole point of replacing them is not to use stock BMW bearings. Note BE bearings usually have a waitlist of 6-months or so until they are in stock, and right now stores have stock of them. If you don't buy soon once they ran out you'll have to wait or choose other brand bearings. Sure an engine stand is nice but even if doing this with engine on the floor it will be 10 times easier than crawling under the car.

As for the clutch pivot pin my advise is stay with the stock plastic one. I don't recall a failure reported on the E6x cars. The aftermarket brass/metal ones will wear the clutch fork.

Did you check newtis? All instructions are in there. The GAS DIY bearing writeup is great too, google GAS e60 m5.
 

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There are no special tools for a clutch job on this car. A plastic alignment tool comes in the luk clutch kit. And even if you didn't have one eye-balling the clutch discs/pressure plate alignment works just fine. If for some reason you plan on reusing your clutch be aware the clutch disc pair is balanced as a set and cannot be rotated with respect to each other (same with the pressure plates). Use paint to mark their alignment. Even better just replace the whole thing using the SMG overhaul I linked before, you don't want to pull the trans out in another 10-20k miles (SMGs seem to act up at 60-70k).
1st sentence is absolutely false. The reason for this response is so that other members are properly informed. I'm not trying to cause a flame war with flacoramos, who is a moderator and levied unsubstantiated comments to me before about my knowledge. The procedure from BMW states otherwise, for good reason. I also worked for Exedy, before moving to GM powertrain, Between the Schaeffler group (LuK) and Exedy, they are the 2 largest OE manufacturers of manual clutch cover, clutch disks, and flywheels in the world. I won't be offended if I'm told once again that I don't know what I'm talking about.

The OE clutch cover and disk is made by Sachs. The Luk version is a Sachs clutch in a Luk box. I have a new in box Sachs clutch, I've yet to open it but I believe it only comes with the pilot bearing, throw out bearing, and clutch assy. This sachs design has an intermediary pressure plate. This is because it is well established that 212300 is needed. I have a 212300 myself. I also have a LUK 6sp manual clutch, that I believe is actually made by LUK. That clutch kit (RepSet) does come with a plastic tool because it is a more conventional clutch cover and disc assembly, there is no intermediary pressure plates or discs.

The factory tool is 212300. Sachs and BMW do NOT spend time and money to design tools when they are not needed for proper service. Baum makes a copy of this tool for something like 200+. Search on eBay. You can also rent one from one of the BMW online parts guys. I don't want to mistakenly name one.

This is a screenshot of the official procedure in ISTA. you can probably find it on newtis also. Send me a PM and I can send you a full copy of the procedure. If you can't PM yet, just reply here and I will PM you. You must replace the 9 bolts with new ones also. This is one of those jobs that you should NOT deviate from the factory procedure, unless you like to do rework.
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