BMW M5 Forum and M6 Forums banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have a deal in the works and I am asking for some advice if anyone is willing. I am in the process of getting my hands on a 2000 M5 for next to nothing. The caveat, it has been sitting garage kept from a family member for 10-12 years. It also got a little moisture in the interior and has mold on the leather seats (not a biggie, clean them and find the failed seal). I am a novice but have the right guys in my corner. A few have rebuilt a couple M3s and have a mechanic friend but I want to do this on my own. Any advice as far as a process to start with and troubleshoot what step by step. The lines are gorgeous, with it being the Blue color scheme and black and blue interior. Any information helps. Cheers!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,862 Posts
Put fresh fuel in and drive it? What needs troubleshooting? You didn't mention how many miles/km are on it or if it runs and starts with a new, fully charged battery. What kind of climate was it stored in?

I'd be prepared to replace the fuel filter after a tank full is run through. Was it stored with a full tank of fuel? Might be considering a fuel pump if not.

If you're asking what I'd like to do, well, that's a lot of work that's probably not really required so I'd recommend driving it and wait for stuff to not work and then troubleshoot. I wouldn't take it on a road trip or to the track. Easy weekend drives of increasing radii until there's a few hundred miles racked up should let you know what's going to require attention.

On the other hand, it might not even turn over and will require starter replacement or overhaul. Then, it might turn over but not run because of rodent or moisture damage or a multitude of sensors not functioning correctly. If it turns over and runs, it may not run correctly due to rodent or moisture damage, a failed or failing sensor, bad fuel, a failed or failing fuel pump, failed or failing ignition coils or fouled spark plug or plugs. If it starts and runs and idles correctly, it might not operate under load because all of the above and more but it might not stop because the long storage period has corroded caliper pistons, slide pins and ruined bores and who knows what condition the brake fluid and pads are in. The tires are most certainly finished and the camshaft position sensors (CPS) are surely the obsoleted versions.

Okay, so what would I do? I'm assuming I don't know the immediate history of the vehicle and this is a fun car and not a primary.

- Purchase and become proficient with a proper BMW diagnostic scanner.
- Top up all fluids then get it to turn over.
- Replace the fuel and fuel filter and have a fuel pump on hand. Purchase new MAFS and CPSs.
- Start it, just get it idling and the engine up to temperature first. Monitor for leaks. Purchase new brake rotors, calipers, pads, lines and brake fluid.
- Replace the spark plugs, engine air intake and cabin filters. Get an oil sample analysis kit from Blackstone Laboratories. Purchase oil separators and associated hoses/grommets amd valve cover gaskets.
- Check all fluid levels again and top off as necessary. Purchase new engine coolant thermostat, water pump, expansion tank, hoses, radiator and coolant/antifreeze.
- Drive around slowly and make sure it rides and stops with no issue. Purchase and install new tires.
- Check all fluid levels and top off. Purchase engine oil and filter, transmission and differential fluid.
Prepare to change engine oil and filter, transmission and differential fluids and engine coolant, water pump and thermostat, brake pads/rotors, etc. You may prepare for engine coolant radiator and expansion tank if you like at this time.
Drive it not around other cars or people. Listen for noises, monitor brake performance, check for leaks. Light at-speed operation is desired because you want to get the entire drivetrain to operating temperature.
- Get back home and replace the engine oil and filter while obtaining a sample for analysis. Drain and refill the transmission and differential. Replace the engine coolant system (radiator and expansion tank optional) and oil separators. Replace the CPSs which you might find easier with the valve covers off. Replace the brake parts at each wheel, bleed the brake fluid and replace it. Replace the MAFS. Purchase new O2 sensors.
- Drive it. Increase the distances slowly and suss out other problems. Expect it to not run super smooth at first as the car gets used to running again and the DME adapts to the new operating conditions. Pay attention.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
159 Posts
Hard to say with limited information. Definitely start with a battery, get the gas out of the tank, fresh gas in, change the oil and see if she runs. The good thing is the car is not too bad to work on yourself. There is a ton of info on this forum and many knowledgeable people on here. I'm not one of the more knowledgeable people, but i managed to do 90% of the work on my car with the help of this forum and YouTube.

The bad thing is that parts are not cheap for the car and the costs add up quickly. Hopefully it was parked in good running condition, you can get it running and you can chip away at the restoration if that is what you plan to do.

The parts for sale thread will probably be your friend for a while. There are people in there with multiple cars on hand and parts for reasonable prices.

After you determine whether or not it runs you can get yourself a scanner and start troubleshooting issues. Most likely someone has experienced the issue and there is a thread on it. There are also several threads by guys who rescued cars. You could dig around and read them to see what they did to get an idea of what it took to get their cars sorted out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Hard to say with limited information. Definitely start with a battery, get the gas out of the tank, fresh gas in, change the oil and see if she runs. The good thing is the car is not too bad to work on yourself. There is a ton of info on this forum and many knowledgeable people on here. I'm not one of the more knowledgeable people, but i managed to do 90% of the work on my car with the help of this forum and YouTube.

The bad thing is that parts are not cheap for the car and the costs add up quickly. Hopefully it was parked in good running condition, you can get it running and you can chip away at the restoration if that is what you plan to do.

The parts for sale thread will probably be your friend for a while. There are people in there with multiple cars on hand and parts for reasonable prices.

After you determine whether or not it runs you can get yourself a scanner and start troubleshooting issues. Most likely someone has experienced the issue and there is a thread on it. There are also several threads by guys who rescued cars. You could dig around and read them to see what they did to get an idea of what it took to get their cars sorted out.
My fault! I forgot to mention this was an every day driver that was driven into the garage for the last time around 10 years ago ans was started up once since. It was left just to collect dust. It has 120,000 miles on it. I will post before pictures once I get it to my garage.

Thank you for your feedback ANYTHING helps me. This will be a fun project and like you suggested, I am am pricing out a BMW diagnostic kit. Actually, fairly in expensive.

I will for sure start with the first big 3 items you mentioned; battery, gas, and then change oil.

Glad so many willing to give input on this discussion board!

Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Put fresh fuel in and drive it? What needs troubleshooting? You didn't mention how many miles/km are on it or if it runs and starts with a new, fully charged battery. What kind of climate was it stored in?

I'd be prepared to replace the fuel filter after a tank full is run through. Was it stored with a full tank of fuel? Might be considering a fuel pump if not.

If you're asking what I'd like to do, well, that's a lot of work that's probably not really required so I'd recommend driving it and wait for stuff to not work and then troubleshoot. I wouldn't take it on a road trip or to the track. Easy weekend drives of increasing radii until there's a few hundred miles racked up should let you know what's going to require attention.

On the other hand, it might not even turn over and will require starter replacement or overhaul. Then, it might turn over but not run because of rodent or moisture damage or a multitude of sensors not functioning correctly. If it turns over and runs, it may not run correctly due to rodent or moisture damage, a failed or failing sensor, bad fuel, a failed or failing fuel pump, failed or failing ignition coils or fouled spark plug or plugs. If it starts and runs and idles correctly, it might not operate under load because all of the above and more but it might not stop because the long storage period has corroded caliper pistons, slide pins and ruined bores and who knows what condition the brake fluid and pads are in. The tires are most certainly finished and the camshaft position sensors (CPS) are surely the obsoleted versions.

Okay, so what would I do? I'm assuming I don't know the immediate history of the vehicle and this is a fun car and not a primary.

- Purchase and become proficient with a proper BMW diagnostic scanner.
- Top up all fluids then get it to turn over.
- Replace the fuel and fuel filter and have a fuel pump on hand. Purchase new MAFS and CPSs.
- Start it, just get it idling and the engine up to temperature first. Monitor for leaks. Purchase new brake rotors, calipers, pads, lines and brake fluid.
- Replace the spark plugs, engine air intake and cabin filters. Get an oil sample analysis kit from Blackstone Laboratories. Purchase oil separators and associated hoses/grommets amd valve cover gaskets.
- Check all fluid levels again and top off as necessary. Purchase new engine coolant thermostat, water pump, expansion tank, hoses, radiator and coolant/antifreeze.
- Drive around slowly and make sure it rides and stops with no issue. Purchase and install new tires.
- Check all fluid levels and top off. Purchase engine oil and filter, transmission and differential fluid.
Prepare to change engine oil and filter, transmission and differential fluids and engine coolant, water pump and thermostat, brake pads/rotors, etc. You may prepare for engine coolant radiator and expansion tank if you like at this time.
Drive it not around other cars or people. Listen for noises, monitor brake performance, check for leaks. Light at-speed operation is desired because you want to get the entire drivetrain to operating temperature.
- Get back home and replace the engine oil and filter while obtaining a sample for analysis. Drain and refill the transmission and differential. Replace the engine coolant system (radiator and expansion tank optional) and oil separators. Replace the CPSs which you might find easier with the valve covers off. Replace the brake parts at each wheel, bleed the brake fluid and replace it. Replace the MAFS. Purchase new O2 sensors.
- Drive it. Increase the distances slowly and suss out other problems. Expect it to not run super smooth at first as the car gets used to running again and the DME adapts to the new operating conditions. Pay attention.
Wow, thank you very much for basically providing a detailed checklist with links to everything. This will help me immensely, I really appreciate the time spent in this reply. I am excited about this project and really see a diamond in the rough. This car was an everyday driver until about 2006-2007 and was put into his garage and sat to collect dust ever since. He has started it once since then and has 120,000 miles on it. This is the fully loaded out model with the black and blue leather interior.

I will post some before pictures as soon as I get it to my garage. The mold which was the seller biggest concerns is minor as I am familiar with how to clean. I am not which seal was bad that let in moisture but we do live here in Louisiana so 75% of the time we have humidity but this was kept in a closed garage. I have tested and the mold should come off easily. I am more concerned with the tubing and fluids and anything that may be locked up.

Thanks again for the details.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
162 Posts
I just fixed a water leak into my interior on my 540i. This is the third time I have had this happen to an E39. The door vapor seal leaks, allowing water hitting the door/window to pour into the car. Not a pinnacle of German engineering. but easy enough to fix. Oddly, all three cars with the issue have happened on the right rear door. To check, run some water onto the door (or better yet, have someone else do that) and take a look at the carpeted area right below the door. If it is wet, that is your problem.


Remove the door panel (pretty easy) and carefully check the vapor seal for loose areas. I found some 3M product at the local auto parts store (called Strip Caulk, item 08578) that is perfect for fixing this. It is VERY sticky black strips of flexible sealant. I bought a box of it and ran a bunch around the entire door/vapor seal mating surface. Pressed the vapor seal into the black 3M product and all is good.


Mold will clean up pretty well, but the smell will be with you for a while. You will not notice it when you are driving the car, because you will be in a happy place!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
I just fixed a water leak into my interior on my 540i. This is the third time I have had this happen to an E39. The door vapor seal leaks, allowing water hitting the door/window to pour into the car. Not a pinnacle of German engineering. but easy enough to fix. Oddly, all three cars with the issue have happened on the right rear door. To check, run some water onto the door (or better yet, have someone else do that) and take a look at the carpeted area right below the door. If it is wet, that is your problem.


Remove the door panel (pretty easy) and carefully check the vapor seal for loose areas. I found some 3M product at the local auto parts store (called Strip Caulk, item 08578) that is perfect for fixing this. It is VERY sticky black strips of flexible sealant. I bought a box of it and ran a bunch around the entire door/vapor seal mating surface. Pressed the vapor seal into the black 3M product and all is good.


Mold will clean up pretty well, but the smell will be with you for a while. You will not notice it when you are driving the car, because you will be in a happy place!
Thank you for the heads up. This will be the first thing I check. I am ready to just get it in my garage and let the fun begin. Hopefully this fun won't drain my bank account, it can't!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,768 Posts
Thank you for the heads up. This will be the first thing I check. I am ready to just get it in my garage and let the fun begin. Hopefully this fun won't drain my bank account, it can't!
Parts are generally not too expensive, many used in common with the E39 5 series. And there are plenty of vendors. Shop around.

If you are mostly doing your own labor, you should be OK. Just prioritize what needs to be done immediately to make the car safe, then address the things needed to make the car better.

Regards,
Jerry
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Update with Pictures

If anyone was interested, here are a few before and after pictures. It is still a work in progress. This vehicle was sitting garage kept for 10 years which obviously means dead and not running what so ever. Got the beast running but now I am moving on to the clutch and brakes, they need to be bled and replenished. Spongy brake and clutch that won't engage while car is running. Adapt and overcome! I am a novice at best and am DIY on just about everything. This has been really fun and hope I can get it operational with bleeding the clutch and brakes. So far: I have eradicated the mold, replaced the fuel pump, rewire the fuel pump float, new battery and changed the oil. New tires will come once operational. I have plenty more pictures if your interested. I know there is minor things to replace (i.e. elbow rest, nav screen which looks baked due to heat, plastics etc.). Happy to hear any thoughts or concerns anyone may have.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,047 Posts
Nice save (in progress)! Keep us updated with the restoration. It's alway gratifying to follow along.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,405 Posts
Nice work. Keep it up! You have a desirable color combo there if you decide to sell it in the future. I would have loved to have found that car... I can always see through the items that need elbow grease to what it could be once cleaned up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
162 Posts
I love threads like these. Super great to see folks like you saving and bringing these great machines back to life!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
149 Posts
Here is a listing of leather cleaners and protectants. You may want to try them to see if they can address the mold issue.

https://www.carbibles.com/best-leather-conditioners-reviewed/

If not, you may want to get the big guns. I have used isopropyl alcohol (or ethanol) in a mix of at least 70/30 with water--put in a spray bottle, then with a lint free cloth, spray the cloth and apply to the molded areas. Depending how stubborn, you may need to re-apply. Get the car in some sun and open all doors and windows. Do this until the mold is gone--then apply a leather product from the listing above. You do NOT want to just clean with the alcohol since it will not only kill most mold--but also strip the leather of its natural oils that you want to replenish with products mentioned.

If skittish--try it in an inconspicuous molded area first. I have done the IPA route with excellent success on another vehicle that sat for a long time. But "Little Tree" air fresheners will only go so far. Also note that if you have mold in the visible areas--you will have more in invisible areas--that means that seats and other surfaces will need to come out to address it. Otherwise you will be going through a lot of "Little Trees" dangling from all areas of your car.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
941 Posts
Nice! Good progress here.
Regarding mold and leather. I'm going to give you a tip, feel free to use it or not, but the only proper way to get rid of the mold in semi-permeable leather like napa in M5, is to treat it with something that kills the mold.

Its a two step process, time consuming some, but luckily, not very expensive.
Get a jug of a APC, I prefer simple green, you can use purple power or similar. Dilute it 50/50 with water (you can even use it full strength if mold is severe) and get a good quality boar brush, bunch of microfiber towels, and bucket of clean water. Dip brush in APC, work into lather, scrub every surface and crevice - then remove all with towels. Repeat if necessary. Soak a clean towel in water, and go over the treated surface once more. Repeat if needed.

Once you done with all leather, let it dry completely - open all doors and windows and let it sit outside on a hot day or something. Once completely dry, apply your favorite leather conditioner. I prefer Leatherique/Glym.

Once that is done, step two. Go to Amazon, and buy a good ozone generator. They are cheap, under $80 in most cases. Read the instructions, don't expose yourself to ozone much. Run the sucker for a few hours, then vent the car. Ozone will kill all the bacteria and eliminate ALL unpleasant smells. The mold will never return.

Alex
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
About this Discussion
13 Replies
10 Participants
TexaZ3
BMW M5 Forum and M6 Forums
M5Board is the best forum community for information on the BMW M5 E60 (V-10), E39 (V-8), E34 (straight 6), E28, F90 and F10. Discuss performance, specs, reviews and more!
Full Forum Listing
Top