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Discussion Starter #1
Only drove my 99 M3 convertible about 600 miles last year :3:. Took it out today as it was 67F in Dayton Ohio. Yeah, it gets hot here once in a while...believe me.

Anyway I drove my E39 M5 about 6k last year as it was my newer car. I had forgotten how much fun the E36 M3 is, and continues to be.

What a difference in driving styles. The M3 needs to be revved high and is very agile. It feels like a go-kart after the M5. I wish my M3 was a coupe so I could track it in place of the M5. Also, E36 mods are way cheaper. Maybe one is on the horizon????

Both great cars, a torque monster and an agile momentum car.

I will always keep both in my stable.
 

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If I get a chance to come up there again, you gotta give me a ride in the M3! :grinyes:
 

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That's exactly how I feel when I drive my M coupe. Getting to 60 MPH may take approximately the same in both cars, but the feel getting there could not be different!
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
It's not? :confused:
Diny: Coupe is a term that has several interpretations. It can be a 4 door or 2 door hard top car or a convertible.

BMW refers to their 2 door hard tops as coupes and their 2 door coupe convertibles as just convertibles. That is why I used that interpretation. Sorry for the confusion....

Some Jeopardy info below..:thumbsup:

History

In the 19th century a coupé was a closed four-wheel horse-drawn carriage, cut (coupé) to eliminate the forward, rear-facing passenger seats, with a single seat inside for two persons behind the driver, who sat on a box outside (see royal carriage illustration, right). Commonly, a coupé had a fixed glass window in the front of the body, protected from road dirt by a high curving dashboard. A landau is a coupé with a folding top.
Through the 1950s opening-roof convertible automobiles were sometimes called convertible coupés, but since the 1960s the term coupé has generally been applied exclusively to fixed-roof models. Coupés generally, but not necessarily, have two doors, although automobile makers have offered four-door coupés and three- and five-door hatchback coupés, as well. Modern coupés generally have the styling feature of frameless doors, with the window glass sealing directly against a weather-strip on the main body.
The SAE distinguishes a coupé from a sedan primarily by interior volume; SAE standard J1100 defines a coupé as a fixed-roof automobile with less than 33 cubic feet (0.93 cubic meters) of rear interior volume. A car with a greater interior volume is technically a two-door sedan, not a coupé, even if it has only two doors. Some car manufacturers may nonetheless choose to use the word coupé (or coupe) to describe such a model, e.g., the Cadillac Coupe de Ville.
Alternatively, a coupé is distinguished from a two-door sedan by the lack of a "B" pillar to support the roof. Sedans have an "A" pillar forward at the windscreen, a "B" pillar aft of the door, and a "C" pillar defining the aftermost roof support at the rear window. Thus with all side-windows down, a coupé would appear windowless from the "A" to the "C" pillars. These fixed-roof models are described as a hardtop. A sedan with all its side-windows down would have a fixed "B" pillar, thus detracting the windowless appearance.
 
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